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Barilius malabaricus (JERDON, 1849)

September 8th, 2015 — 12:43pm
Tabrez Sheriff

Probably restricted to southern parts of Karnataka state and northern Kerala state in southwestern India. Following its revalidation in 2015 (see ‘Notes’) it is known with certainty only from the Payaswini and Vallapattanam river systems in Kerala although it is thought to occur elsewhere.

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Barilius ardens KNIGHT, RAI, D'SOUZA & VIJAYKRISHNAN, 2015

September 8th, 2015 — 11:50am
Tabrez Sheriff

Prior to its description this species was typically identified as the congener B. canarensis in the ornamental trade.

It can be distinguished from congeners by the following combination of characters: uni…

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Puntigrus pulcher (RENDAHL, 1922)

August 6th, 2015 — 7:49pm
Frank Schäfer

This species occasionally appears in the aquarium hobby, but the trade is largely reliant on commercially-produced ‘tiger barbs’ of questionable origin.

It was considered a synonym of P. anchisporus for a number of decades following Alfred (1963), but revalidated by Kottelat and Tan (2011).

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Puntigrus navjotsodhii (TAN, 2012)

August 4th, 2015 — 11:29pm
Tan Heok Hui

The type series was collected from a small clear-water stream with a pH of 6.0, forming a series of riffles and deeper pools, with a maximum width of 5 metres and depth ranging from 10 cm to 1 metre. The substrate was composed of sand gravel and rocks, with some leaf litter and overhanging marginal vegetation.

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Puntius kamalika SILVA, MADUWAGE & PETHIYAGODA, 2008

Kami's Barb

January 9th, 2015 — 12:41pm
Hiranya Sudasinghe

Prior to its description P. kamalika was referred to as P. amphibius, a putatively valid species probably restricted to western India.

It differs from all congeners in the following combination of characters: 4½/1/2½ scales in a transverse line between the mid-dorsal…

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Nematabramis steindachnerii POPTA, 1905

November 14th, 2014 — 11:39am
Michael Lo

Endemic to northern and central Borneo, with records from the Malaysian states of Sarawak and Sabah, Brunei Darussalam, and the Indonesian provinces North Kalimantan (Kalimantan Utara) and East Kalimantan (Kalimantan Timur).

Type locality is ‘Kajan River, eastern slope of central Kalimantan, Indonesia [Borneo]’.

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Nematabramis everetti BOULENGER, 1894

November 13th, 2014 — 9:07pm
Michael Lo

Nematabramis species are found a variety of habitat-types, from swiftly-flowing affluent streams to pools, lakes, and degraded swamps. Based on the available collection records juveniles and subadults of N. everetti display a preference for fast-moving water whereas adults are found in deeper, slower stretches of minor tributaries.

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Nematabramis borneensis INGER & CHIN, 1962

November 12th, 2014 — 8:25pm
Marco Endruweit

It looks particularly similar to N. alestes with both species possessing a colour pattern comprising a dark lateral stripe on the body, but can be distinguished immediately by possessing barbels longer than the head (vs. shorter than the head in N. alestes).

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Nematabramis alestes (SEALE & BEAN, 1907)

November 12th, 2014 — 7:03pm
Zhou Hang

N. alestes is the only member of the genus in which the barbels are shorter than the head, with additional diagnostic characters as follows: 8-9 branched dorsal-fin rays; 12-14 branched anal-fin rays; 22-23 predorsal scales; body with a pronounced ventral keel.

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Mystacoleucus lepturus HUANG, 1979

November 11th, 2014 — 6:50pm
http://ffish.asia

This species can be distinguished from congeners by the following combination of characters: body relatively slender, depth fitting 3.4-3.8 times in SL; 32-33 + 2 lateral line scales; 14 circumpeduncular scale rows; presence of a single pair of barbels; black distal margin on dorsal-fin; numerous body scales with dark, crescent-shaped markings.

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