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Aphanius transgrediens (ERMIN, 1946)

March 13th, 2012 — 1:24pm

The modified lower jaw and reduced scalation exhibited by this little-known species have seen it placed in the disused genera Anatolichthys and Turkichthys in the past and it is still sometimes listed as a species of Lebias although that generic name has long been considered a synonym of Cyprinodon by most authorities and an ICZN committee voted to suppress the name in favour of Aphanius as recently as 2003. You're unlikely to find it on sale in aquatic stores although it ma…

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Aphanius anatoliae (LEIDENFROST, 1912)

March 13th, 2012 — 1:24pm

A. anatoliae is the most widely-distributed of the Anatolian Aphanius species although like most of its congeners is not easy to come by in the hobby. You are unlikely to find it on sale in aquatic stores although it may be available via specialist breeders or associations from time-to-time. While Aphanius spp. are certainly not as colourful as some of their relatives their interesting behaviour and continuous activity make them fascinating aquarium subjects and well worth a try if you possess the de…

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Aphanius splendens (KOSSWIG & SÖZER, 1945)

March 13th, 2012 — 1:24pm

The elongated, slender body profile, angular lower jaw and reduced scalation exhibited by this little-known subspecies have seen it placed in the disused genera Anatolichthys and Kosswigichthys in the past and it's still inexplicably listed as a species of Lebias by some sources (for the record Lebias has long been considered a synonym of Cyprinodon by most authorities and an ICZN committee voted to suppress the name in favour of Aphanius as recently as 2003). You're unlikely to find i…

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Jordanella floridae GOODE & BEAN, 1879

Florida Flagfish

March 13th, 2012 — 1:19pm

Contrary to many reports, including a number of scientific papers, this species breeds in the same way as other cyprinodontids and does not dig pits or exhibit extended parental care.

It’s a fractional spawner with females depositing eggs on a more-or-less continuous basis when a warm temperature is maintained though ideally it should be permitted to breed on a seasonal basis in spring and late summer as it would in nature.

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