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More Pics From The Trip, Last Sunday
May 12, 2010
12:13 am
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johnpeten
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Some pics taken during the last trip. Including an unidentified bird and some campesinos doing something very odd.

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May 12, 2010
9:12 am
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coelacanth
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Top picture is of black-bellied whistling ducks.

May 12, 2010
9:58 am
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Bluedave
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They look to be collecting freshwater? But wouldn't get much out of that small contraption!

May 12, 2010
11:26 am
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johnpeten
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QUOTE (coelacanth @ May 12 2010, 02:55 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
Top picture is of black-bellied whistling ducks.


Wow, many thanks, that is a very interesting bird. Dendrocygna autumnalis. Found in the Southern US through to Central America. In all my years here this is the first sighting. They probably only survive because they live in a remote inaccessible part of the Lake.
This was also my first sighting of Pelicans who survive here for the same reason.
The only waterfowl that are common all over the Lake are Cormorants, which probably don't taste very good.

May 12, 2010
11:47 am
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johnpeten
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QUOTE (Bluedave @ May 12 2010, 03:41 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
They look to be collecting freshwater? But wouldn't get much out of that small contraption!


These people are squatters who have established themselves in a remote area (very common here). I think that you have got it right. They have built a sump for collecting water. It is obviously a permanent "structure" and they were probably improving it.

This whole area(several square miles) on the Southern shore of the Western extension of the Lake was bought, many years ago by one of our Military Presidents and has been left forgotten and undeveloped ever since. From the Sat photo it appears that Campesinos (Peasant squatters) have settled and made Milpas (small holdings)

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May 12, 2010
12:47 pm
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coelacanth
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QUOTE (johnpeten @ May 12 2010, 12:09 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
The only waterfowl that are common all over the Lake are Cormorants, which probably don't taste very good.

I'm aware of a few recipes for Cormorant, most of which involve wrapping the bird in straw and boiling it all in a large pot, then throwing away the cormorant and eating the straw...

The only genuine recipe I've read necessitated soaking the creature in lye before cooking to make it edible.

May 12, 2010
12:55 pm
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Bluedave
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QUOTE (coelacanth @ May 12 2010, 01:30 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm aware of a few recipes for Cormorant, most of which involve wrapping the bird in straw and boiling it all in a large pot, then throwing away the cormorant and eating the straw...

The only genuine recipe I've read necessitated soaking the creature in lye before cooking to make it edible.

Nice!

May 12, 2010
3:13 pm
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johnpeten
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QUOTE (coelacanth @ May 12 2010, 06:30 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
The only genuine recipe I've read necessitated soaking the creature in lye before cooking to make it edible.


Thanks but I won't tell the locals about this. They are very familiar with Lye; they use it to shuck the Maize before it is milled into pasta for tortillas. The Lye also does something to the Maize to make it more nutritious. Very strange but the Ancient Maya new about this 2,000 years ago.

I am amazed what these people knew and also other ancient civilisations. This makes me believe that they were visited by ETs.

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