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Anableps anableps
October 12, 2009
11:56 am
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Matt
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Anyone have direct breeding experience with this bugger?

Cake or death?
October 12, 2009
4:21 pm
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Mark Duffill
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Myself and a good friend kept a small group some years ago, we struggled for some time to get them feeding properly but once we had that cracked we had a few young off the group.

We had two males with a group of 5 females but all the females had left foricula and only one of the males had a right gonopodium, unfortunately we lost the left male before we could get any right females.

October 12, 2009
7:41 pm
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coelacanth
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I've done them. I'm not totally convinced by the left and right thing, the end of the nadger is pretty mobile, they almost go round corners!
Huge appetite, especially gravid females. You can tell when a female is close to term because she gets very aggressive.
Last lot we had were sent down to the Horniman when they needed some for their opening.

October 13, 2009
10:21 am
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Matt
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Hi Pete so males can mate with any female and move their bits according to which side they approach from do you reckon?

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October 13, 2009
12:01 pm
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keith565
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i too have bred these. i agree there is some doubt about the left and right males.
mine fed like vultures on frozen foods, pond pellets and just about anything they could get. i found quite a few of my young died as they were born with open abdomens that didn't close fast enough.
but a great fish to have. hmm, might keep a look out for some now you mention it.lol

October 14, 2009
10:05 am
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coelacanth
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QUOTE (Matt @ Oct 13 2009, 11:04 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi Pete so males can mate with any female and move their bits according to which side they approach from do you reckon?

I think so, having watched them at it. They see to only approach from one side according to the cut of their jib, that's true, but I think they are able to jiggle it, just a little bit.

October 14, 2009
10:09 am
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coelacanth
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QUOTE (keith565 @ Oct 13 2009, 12:44 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
i found quite a few of my young died as they were born with open abdomens that didn't close fast enough.

I've had this occur also, I couldn't decide whether it was down to insufficient nutrition, excess disturbance, female too young or summat else.

October 21, 2009
6:32 pm
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Matt
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What did you chaps used to feed them? Just finished reading a v. interesting paper on its feeding migrations. The fish move with the tide each day and up to 50% of the natural diet is composed of red algae...

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October 23, 2009
3:39 pm
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coelacanth
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Just about anything, quality frozen foods, dried foods, I used to prefer feeding low-protein foods on a frequent basis as I thought this probably tallied with their natural diet.
From watching them I thought they were probably grazing in extremely shallow water on whatever the tide had left on the flats (definitely not surface feeders IMO, they have a subterminal mouth, not built for eating off the top even though they will do so enthusiastically).
Have you got an electronic copy of that there paper? I'd be really interested to have a read.

October 24, 2009
1:20 am
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Matt
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I have indeed. Pm me your email addy and it's yours. /smile.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":)" border="0" alt="smile.gif" />

Edit: btw your theory on the mouth shape and its purpose is spot on.

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October 24, 2009
12:01 pm
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coelacanth
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QUOTE (Matt @ Oct 24 2009, 02:03 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
Edit: btw your theory on the mouth shape and its purpose is spot on.

Cool, I like being right, doesn't happen often.,,,
When I first got some of these fish, the only information available was the tired old rubbish in books published by something that sounds like THF, so I got a load of fruit fly cultures on the go to be able to offer them the "correct diet". Took a few minutes of observation to see the lie in this, they much preferred to feed on the bottom, although in water over a couple of inches deep they were too buoyant to remain there (although they are so greedy that they will take food wherever this is).
So my guess was that they normally feed in areas where all they have to do is duck their heads to graze, making the bouyancy less of a problem. I also think the "greediness" is an anthropomorphism, in the wild they have to feed almost constantly (like grazing mullet) in order to get enough nutrition, they can't just switch this off because we feed them on richer foods.

I also think some mudskippers are like this, which is why some species faily to thrive in captivity when fed in the usual "2 feeds a day" regime of people who work for a living.

Edited because I was eating toast while typing....

October 24, 2009
12:11 pm
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Matt
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Yeah and the left and right-sided thing is perhaps a myth too. I exchanged emails with the author of the paper and he confirmed my suspicion that this would mean the fish have 50% less chance of finding a mate than 'normal' species. Counter-argument is that because they occupy such a specialised ecological niche and are always found together then perhaps no evolutionary bottle-neck has occurred.

As far as feeding from the surface goes; wait 'til you read the paper. /ph34r.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":ph34r:" border="0" alt="ph34r.gif" /> Based on what I read I'd say Drosophila and suchlike still make good eating for these. They don't graze constantly either, they stuff themselves twice a day then go and chill out on the beach!

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October 24, 2009
1:27 pm
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coelacanth
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QUOTE (Matt @ Oct 24 2009, 12:54 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
Counter-argument is that because they occupy such a specialised ecological niche and are always found together then perhaps no evolutionary bottle-neck has occurred.


There could be a genetic advantage linked to the "handedness" which ensures it remains. Would be interesting for someone to look at this, although I still think that it's a free-for-all based on what I've seen of the mobility of the tip of the organ.

QUOTE
As far as feeding from the surface goes; wait 'til you read the paper. /ph34r.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":ph34r:" border="0" alt="ph34r.gif" /> Based on what I read I'd say Drosophila and suchlike still make good eating for these. They don't graze constantly either, they stuff themselves twice a day then go and chill out on the beach!


So they feed intensively for the period when the tides allow them to, follow the rising water inshore and then stay in shallow water away from subsurface predators until the feeding areas are available again?
In tanks they react differently to threats depending on the direction. From beneath them they surface-skitter, from above they crash-dive. They're also nervous if the water is too deep, I've thought this is because in the wild this would expose them to predators like Snook etc.

October 25, 2009
2:20 am
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Matt
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QUOTE (coelacanth @ Oct 24 2009, 02:10 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
So they feed intensively for the period when the tides allow them to, follow the rising water inshore and then stay in shallow water away from subsurface predators until the feeding areas are available again?

Yup. /thumbs_up.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":thumbsup:" border="0" alt="thumbs_up.gif" />

QUOTE (coelacanth @ Oct 24 2009, 02:10 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
In tanks they react differently to threats depending on the direction. From beneath them they surface-skitter, from above they crash-dive. They're also nervous if the water is too deep, I've thought this is because in the wild this would expose them to predators like Snook etc.

Seems they live their lives entirely in a few inches of water which I guess explains that behaviour. V. interesting to get first-hand details. Pete if you want the paper I need your email address. /tongue.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":p" border="0" alt="tongue.gif" />

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October 28, 2009
3:59 pm
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Matt
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Here are some habitat pics kindly supplied for the species profile by Uwe Krumme; will add them when I edit it as a lot of the current info is naff. This is the second-largest expanse of mangrove forest in the world, a few hundred km south of the Amazon delta in the Brazilian state of Pará:

Mangrove stilt roots in the high intertidal zone at low tide with red and green algae encrusting them. The fish graze on this stuff when the water rises.

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Fish themselves at low water in one of the permanent channels (next to the floating branch):

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The forest at high tide:

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[Image Can Not Be Found] [Image Can Not Be Found] [Image Can Not Be Found]

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October 29, 2009
10:20 am
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retro_gk
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I'd like to get ahold of that thar paper, too, Matt. Gracias.

October 29, 2009
6:11 pm
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Matt
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Duda señor. /biggrin.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":D" border="0" alt="biggrin.gif" />

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December 13, 2009
3:32 pm
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Matt
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Added a couple of new images to the profile. Gotta love the one of them 'wave-surfing'. /biggrin.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":D" border="0" alt="biggrin.gif" />

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[Image Can Not Be Found] [Image Can Not Be Found]

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August 10, 2010
10:08 pm
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Matt
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Sent. /smile.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":)" border="0" alt="smile.gif" />

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