LOGIN

RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube
GLOSSARY       

SEARCHGLOSSARY

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

PROFILESEARCH

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





 

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Aspidoras dorsal rays
June 18, 2012
3:45 am
Avatar
mikev
NYC
Community Helper
Forum Posts: 1134
Member Since:
January 11, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

From the profile on SF:

A. pauciradiatus can be further distinguished from congeners by the presence of only 6 soft dorsal rays, as opposed to 7 in other Aspidoras species.

i recall this from other sources too... decided to check on the species I have... well, of the four, two refused to cooperate with photos, albaters clearly had 7, but what is this?

http://www.micropress-inc.com/fishpic/aspara.jpgImage Enlarger

Do I see 9?  In the defense of the fish, it is an undescribed species, thus not a part of any key...

(Plaamoo, this is the fish I had space for... they are 15-20mm, I can keep them with shrimp or something else nano, no space used. 😀 )

June 18, 2012
11:58 pm
Avatar
mikev
NYC
Community Helper
Forum Posts: 1134
Member Since:
January 11, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Ooops...forgot to say what these are.

 

Sold (by Wetspot) as Aspidoras sp. Araguaia.  What they *really* are is not clear.. Notice that Aspidoras pauciradiatus seem to come from Rio Araguaia but these are not them. The fish seems smaller than other Aspidoras species (I probably have juveniles but still)... the distinct characteristics seem to be a black lateral line and a brown spot on top just ahead of the dorsal fin.

Naturally I googled around... not all "Aspidoras sp. Araguaia" featured on the web is this species, but naturaqua.fr seems to have good photos of this species; it is also quite possible that the fish is identical to C125,

http://www.planetcatfish.com/a.....s_sp(c125)

July 24, 2012
5:04 pm
Avatar
mikev
NYC
Community Helper
Forum Posts: 1134
Member Since:
January 11, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Here is something very nutty about aspidoras: they seem to be able to do things above the water level. I saw these new chaps running on the glass above the water level a couple of times, when they are excited about feeding.... did not believe my eyes, and yesterday found this

http://www.micropress-inc.com/fishpic/aalbater-eggs-above-water.jpgImage Enlarger

in a tank with A.cf.albater, the cluster is >1cm above the water level. How this was done given the small size of fish (20mm fem, 1mm male) I don't understand... but this is definitely not due to lowering the water level, evaporation should have been minimal since the water change two days ago. And the eggs felt wet... I don't know if they are fertile yet. Confused

July 31, 2012
6:35 pm
Avatar
mikev
NYC
Community Helper
Forum Posts: 1134
Member Since:
January 11, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

@Matt,

whenever you get to aspidoras profiles, hopefully this will be of use:

http://www.micropress-inc.com/fishpic/aaspa1.jpgImage Enlarger

this is "Aspidoras sp. Araguaia" ==(likely) C125; slightly smaller species (max 1.6"), distinguishing characteristics seems to be the black strip.
Trivia: of all the Aspidora species I have seen these have far the strongest interest in artemia (aspidoras pauciradiatus are the other extreme: uninterested), and are capable of short runs on the glass above the water.

August 1, 2012
8:04 am
Avatar
Matt
Málaga, Spain
Admin
Forum Posts: 8239
Member Since:
June 13, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Interesting - do you know much about their natural habitat Mike?

Cake or death?
August 1, 2012
5:26 pm
Avatar
mikev
NYC
Community Helper
Forum Posts: 1134
Member Since:
January 11, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Zilch :(

I'd like to ... that there is some eerie above-the-water activity is certain (I'm not the only one who found eggs high above the water) makes me want to understand this.

August 1, 2012
7:30 pm
Avatar
Graham Ramsay
Blairgowrie - UK
Veteran
Forum Posts: 301
Member Since:
July 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I've had one or two species lay above the water line. C. rabauti & C. diphyes come to mind. Also I lost all but one Aspidoras sp. "Goia" when they left their tank during a spawning frenzy.

August 2, 2012
7:39 am
Avatar
mikev
NYC
Community Helper
Forum Posts: 1134
Member Since:
January 11, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Very interesting... it is even more difficult to imagine a "full-bodied" cory like c.rabauti holding to the glass outside of the water...

Hmm... something has come up during a discussion elsewhere... it seems that C125 may not be a valid species but a duplicate of a.spilotus.

August 3, 2012
8:23 am
Avatar
Matt
Málaga, Spain
Admin
Forum Posts: 8239
Member Since:
June 13, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Are there any theories as to why those species do this?

Cake or death?
August 5, 2012
7:40 pm
Avatar
mikev
NYC
Community Helper
Forum Posts: 1134
Member Since:
January 11, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Gotta be a mechanism to protect the eggs from predation.

In my case this only happened in the tank where the aspidoras have tankmates and I wonder if this is relevant; in single species tanks this never happened. The other difference in this tank is that it is covered so the air above the water is likely more humid and the eggs would not dry out, can the fish test humidity?

August 6, 2012
9:31 am
Avatar
Matt
Málaga, Spain
Admin
Forum Posts: 8239
Member Since:
June 13, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Perhaps species adopting this strategy inhabit shallow/running water so the eggs are kept wet by natural means if laid just above the water line?

Cake or death?
August 6, 2012
3:18 pm
Avatar
donovan
Member
Forum Posts: 42
Member Since:
January 8, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

i think that it is interesting that they laid them on the seal of the tank. are there any other clusters that are not on the seal because they may be using it as an adhesive.

August 6, 2012
4:21 pm
Avatar
mikev
NYC
Community Helper
Forum Posts: 1134
Member Since:
January 11, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Matt said

Perhaps species adopting this strategy inhabit shallow/running water so the eggs are kept wet by natural means if laid just above the water line?

Arrgh. I was talking about this with the top cory guy in the US, he mentioned a.spilotus also doing it, and suggested that the fish might come back to splash on the eggs.... not impossible, but your "natural means" is better, I have a problem with the parental care idea for cories.

Donovan: no, the eggs are adhesive and stick to glass just fine; I don't know why this group favors corners. BTW, the eggs did not hatch, and I found a few more yesterday, this time in another corner, but also above water, and this time obviously bad.
While this group is corner-oriented, I've seen albaters deposit eggs on all kinds of things, including string algae, and one time on a large ramshorn snail ?! ...
Spilotus for me so far only use the top of anubias leaves.

August 7, 2012
3:30 pm
Avatar
donovan
Member
Forum Posts: 42
Member Since:
January 8, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

ok thank you i have seen non adhesive eggs and have had no experience with these fish so i was unaware that they had adhesive eggs.

Forum Timezone: Europe/Paris

Most Users Ever Online: 246

Currently Online:
1 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Devices in use: Desktop (1)

Top Posters:

Stefan: 1567

Plaamoo: 1257

mikev: 1134

Malti: 1099

Mark Duffill: 1012

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 0

Members: 30519

Moderators: 0

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 4

Forums: 10

Topics: 4603

Posts: 36641

Newest Members: wong123, Kevin20359, troides, noos, ziedive

Administrators: dunc: 1323, Matt: 8239