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Ctenogobius shufeldti
July 16, 2014
6:58 pm
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mikev
NYC
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Little hope of this, but does anyone have any info?

July 18, 2014
7:04 pm
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mikev
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After asking around, little info and sounds like more difficult than rhino... probably plankton or marine rotifers needed with brackish water for fry raising.

Jutta et al, if you are still around.... one of the people I talked to suggest to consider Clown Goby (Microgobius gulosus) instead ... know anything about them?

July 26, 2014
6:17 pm
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Matt
Málaga, Spain
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These seem to be primarily marine species Mike are you turning to the dark side? Surprised

Cake or death?
July 27, 2014
6:32 am
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mikev
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I'm turning to the dark side all right (I have a seafood tank now and want to try marine gobies too)... but these two are freshwater, at least in some populations. Microgobius gulosus can be found in a Florida lake. From what I hear the fish is basically a N.A. analog of rhinogobius and likely breedable (freshwater gobies tend to have fry that is larger since microscopic food is not available).

Unfortunately it seems that the way to get it is to go myself and collect which is too advanced for me.... :(

July 27, 2014
9:00 pm
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BillT
Eugene, Oregon
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Off topic tangent:

I'm turning to the dark side all right (I have a seafood tank now and want to try marine gobies too)… but these two are freshwater, at least in some populations. Microgobius gulosus can be found in a Florida lake.

Turns out lionfish can be freshwater also, there could well be others:

http://www.miamiherald.com/201.....oject.html

 

I have for many years been fascinated by the little fish (maybe gobies?) in Hawaii that evolved from strictly salt water fish, colonized the freshwaters of Hawaii (but return to the sea to breed) and can climb up waterfalls with their fin-derived sucker device.

Bill Trevarrow [email protected]
July 27, 2014
9:23 pm
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mikev
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Very interesting about the lionfish! Now, I'm tempted... Embarassed

as for the gobies: the fresh/salt water cycle (larvae develops in seawater) you describe is very common.... and very annoying..... algae-eating gobies, stiphodons et al, which are very pretty are unfortunately all like this, thus practically unbreadable.

July 27, 2014
11:57 pm
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Plaamoo
Bellingham, Washington U.S.A.
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BillT said

 I have for many years been fascinated by the little fish (maybe gobies?) in Hawaii that evolved from strictly salt water fish, colonized the freshwaters of Hawaii (but return to the sea to breed) and can climb up waterfalls with their fin-derived sucker device.

You're likely thinking of a sicyopterus sp. Bill. Incredible fish! I believe the term is amphidromous.

 

July 28, 2014
12:18 am
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BillT
Eugene, Oregon
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There are also Hawaiian non-native freshwater fish that living in salty conditions:

 

When in Hawaii, I have most often stayed on the big island at a place about 3 blocks from ocean.

They have a pond in the yard about 15 x 30 feet and 5-6 feet deep in places.

They ground is porous lava rack. The pond is brackish and goes up and down with the tides and has established populations of Tilapia and mollies. I was surprised about the tilapia biut not the mollies.

Bill Trevarrow [email protected]
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