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fish infertility
April 1, 2013
9:12 pm
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BillT
Eugene, Oregon
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Methylene blue in too high doses in spawning and juvenile fish can lead to infertility, Mike.

 

The above quote is from another thread. It intrigued me, so I thought I would start a new thread based upon it.

 

I am interested if there are other treatments/conditions that people know about that can cause infertility and if the effect is permanent or not.

 

For example I am aware of a fish lab that once had epoxy work done in the same room their air blower was in so that the fume laden air was bubbled through their zebrafish tanks. This did not kill fish but caused them to stop breeding from about 6 months, after which they resumed.

 

There are two reasons people might want to know this:

1) to avoid the situation

2) to make it happen.

The reasons for avoiding it are obvious, but there are also good reasons to make it happen. There is now at least one US patent for making fish sterile (permanently). This is often done to prevent released fish from breeding with wild fish or to maximize growth because energy is not diverted to reproductive purposes. This could also be used by breeders to limit the distribution of their genetic lines.Does any one do this?

Seems like it could also raise ethical questions.

 

 

 

Bill Trevarrow [email protected]
April 1, 2013
11:24 pm
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oaken
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Not exactly sterility I suppose, but I have read that plasticisers can feminise males and thus some labs are careful about using plastics for fish when doing experiments on fish. That includes the usage of buckets, plastic pipes etc.

I read that there has been experiments made on Pomatoschistus minutus that showed that males exposed to certain plasticisers didn't care for the offspring as well as the males that were kept in a clean environment. 

April 2, 2013
12:44 am
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mikev
NYC
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actually, this is true not only for fish, humans too :
http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_.....t43_en.pdf
the scary question is we may be messing up the fish by giving them breeding pvc's.

April 2, 2013
3:17 am
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BillT
Eugene, Oregon
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mikev said
actually, this is true not only for fish, humans too :
http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_.....t43_en.pdf
the scary question is we may be messing up the fish by giving them breeding pvc's.

Nice link!

 

Although I was wondering about sterility, I also find other chemical effects on fish interesting.

 

Plasticizers make flexible vinyl airline tubing flexible. Vinyl is similar to PVC and is normally a stiff plastic. Old vinyl airline tubing gets stiff, presumably when the plastiziers have leached out.

 

I used to run a zebrafish facility. We accidentally discovered that certain n-buna rubber o-rings were killing baby fish on a particular tank rack. We came up with a quick and sensitive test for things that kill or adversely affect baby zebrafish. We used to test as many of the materials we had in contact with the fish water as we could and found about 1/3 of plastics and rubbers had these affects.

The test involved getting a bunch of freshly laid eggs (50-100 or more), splitting them into two groups, putting each in glass beakers (with 50-100 mls of water) with the materials to test in one of the beakers. Check (count) the fish daily and compare the experimental vs. controls. This is a very sensitive test because the water is not exchanged and in a small volume. The more material per volume, the more sensitive the test presumably be.

It is an easy test to do if you have easy access to a regular supply of fish eggs. ZF are also convenient because they grow rapidly and are easy to observe with a dissecting scope. This should also applies to many other species.

material-test.jpgImage Enlarger

 

A vet did some tests with adult fish but they were: more difficult to set up, involved fewer fish that were more difficult to come by, took longer, and were more difficult to assay the results.

Bill Trevarrow [email protected]
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