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Fish suggestions for 45 cm Planted Iwagumi
March 15, 2016
9:10 pm
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ShadowMac
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March 6, 2012
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Looking for some suggestions for fish that would appreciate a bit of current in a planted iwagumi layout with Seiryu stone. There will be one location of relative shelter for the fish to rest, but most of the tank will have a decent amount of flow. It is adjustable with about 3 different speed settings, so can be turned down if necessary.

I have kept some Vietnamese white clouds in the tank when it had more stems. This will be all low growing plants. HC and C. parva. CO2 enriched, high light. The white clouds did well, they just got moved to another setup and I don't want to drag them out of there..it would be a task.

Anyone have some good ideas? I usually browse the knowledge base for ideas or to check if fish would be appropriate. I'd prefer not to run a heater so temp will probably be 64-68 F. I can run a heater if needed.

Thanks for your help!

My last scape in this tank:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1448/25048477095_e91afecd25.jpgImage Enlarger

March 18, 2016
9:58 pm
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ShadowMac
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no one has any thoughts on this?

March 18, 2016
11:35 pm
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Byron Hosking
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There are not really a lot of fish in the hobby that appreciate strong currents, but a couple occur to me.  Some of the loricariids from certain fast-flowing streams and rivers in South America, such as the Rio Xingu, is one group.  A second would be the hillstream loaches of SE Asia.

But this raises the issue of a planted tank.  The above-mentioned fish, especially the loaches, require algae mats to graze, and as this is a planted tank you might not want to be encouraging algae.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA Vancouver, BC Canada
March 20, 2016
11:28 pm
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ShadowMac
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Thank you Byron. This leads to another question....fast current seems to be a subjective term. In nature we have a good idea what a quick moving stream or river looks like and slow one from the surface, but how does that translate to under the water or what we would see in an aquarium. I've seen underwater video of GBRs in the wild or tetras and thought the current was much faster than in any tank I've ever run. So how do we decide what is a lot of flow or not? I'm asking because maybe my flow isn't fast. Its certainly not what I've seen of wild videos where some of the algae grazing fish live.

March 21, 2016
12:01 am
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Byron Hosking
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Yes, many of our terms are quite subjective, which makes it more difficult to ensure we are all on the same page.

One thing to keep in mind when watching videos of natural rivers is that the flow is strongest in the centre, and much less so along the banks.  And it is along the banks under overhanging vegetation or among twisted branches and sometimes aquatic vegetation that the fish are usually though not always found.  Then there is the wet season of six months when the forest floods and the fish move into the flooded forest, where the flow will be negligible, more like a pond.  When the dry season occurs, the receding water forces the fish into the streams and rivers, but this is not to say the fish prefer this; they have no option.

Fighting any current takes energy for the fish, and this can easily be detrimental.  One author in TFH used the analogy of driving a car up a steep hill; it takes more energy/gas to maintain the same speed as on level ground.  If fish are having to expend significant energy just to "live" it can deprive them of needed energy for their immune system, digestion, etc., and cause them to literally wear out sooner.

One important observation can be taken from having a large tank (115g, 5 feet in length) with a canister filter.  The flow from the filter return will be quite strong, and if this is placed at one end of the tank (and it can be directed into the wall to further dissipate), it will become naturally reduced as it moves down the length of the tank to the filter intake.  With more than a hundred smallish fish in this tank, it was interesting to observe how many of them show a preference to invariably remain out of the strongest flow.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA Vancouver, BC Canada
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