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Pentair Lifegard Fluidized Bed Filter Fb300
September 19, 2010
1:12 pm
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rionthai
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Forum Posts: 1
Member Since:
September 13, 2010
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hey all,

Need help with the Pentair LifeGard Fluidized Bed Filter FB300,

As quoted from the manual on the pH of the water,

"Nitrifying bacteria produce acids when utilizing the
ammonia and nitrite in the water. These acids decrease
the pH in the aquarium and will inhibit the nitrification
process when this value drops below an acceptable level.
This will lead to a dangerous build up of ammonia! It is
therefore vital that the pH be tested weekly and a proper
level is maintained in the aquarium. Please contact the
dealer in your area for advice in recommending the
proper additive for maintaining the optimum pH level.
Recommended levels:
pH............................
fresh water- above 6.2
salt water- 8.2 - 8.4"

as i have a four foot brackish water tank which needs the water's pH to be around 4-5
does this mean the sand bed filter is useless/dangerous for me to use it?
hope someone could clarify as i do not wish my fish to suffocate in ammonia,

cheers

thai

September 20, 2010
7:06 am
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Matt
Málaga, Spain
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June 13, 2011
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Just to clarify, you need a pH of 4-5 in a brackish tank?

Cake or death?
September 20, 2010
9:21 am
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MatsP
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Forum Posts: 116
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August 23, 2010
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Interesting discussion. I have heard other people say that filtration stops working a low pH.

I'm pretty sure that it doesn't matter what manner of biological filtration you are using - the difference perhaps is that the FB filter is intended for heavily stocked systems (because it is efficient at performing the biological filtration), so it is more likely to have a quick change in pH due to the filter itself working, and this leads to sudden ammonia spikes. On a system with less heavy filtration and thus lower stocking levels, the risk of sudden changes in pH is a bit less. No matter whether the filter is a high-tech FB filter or an old air-driven corner box filter, the bacteria species and the chemical reactions involved are the same - the only difference is the amount of waste different filters can cope with in a given amount of time.

--
Mats

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