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Sewellia marmorata
February 13, 2016
11:40 am
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torso
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Sewellia SEW 02 were more efficient lately in a identic tank-set. I don't think, S. marmorata is different in spawning. Saw some attempts, but no offspring as for SEW 02.

February 21, 2016
11:29 pm
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olly
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Hi Charles! It is well that mormorates are trying to spawn. We will hope for a successful event and wait for it.Smile

Mine are only chaising each other and that's all.

October 9, 2016
11:56 pm
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torso
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Hi

Just noted first fry of S. marmorate, about 11 mm long.

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 Pattern is different to other Sewellia fry at this age (about 4 weeks)

Cheers Charles

October 15, 2016
7:34 pm
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Plaamoo
Bellingham, Washington U.S.A.
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Great job Charles!

November 20, 2016
12:56 am
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olly
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Hi Charles!

You are the first who bred Sewellia marmorata in the captivity. And now the photos of eggs from the spawning on November 4, 2016, prolarva on November 6 and today's photo of larva of my Sewellia marmorata.Sewellia-marmorata-eggs1.jpgImage Enlarger

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 Sewellia-marmorata-larvae16days-after-spawning1234.jpgImage Enlarger

 

How are your Sewellia marmorata fry doing now?

November 21, 2016
10:00 pm
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torso
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Hi Olly

That's great to see. How do you breed them? Coconut-style? Confused

Seems, they do spawn greater quantities?

Mine seem to do well, but actually I'm moving household, atelier, storage places and soon breeding room. So there's not much time to watch.

Cheers Charles

November 27, 2016
5:56 pm
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olly
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Hi Charles!

Thank you!

Good luck with the move!

 I think that there were more than 90 eggs. Here is the most part of them at this pic (about 70). Most of them are not fertilized or were not survived. Size is about 1 mm. Only two females are in my group of S.marmorata. It is likely that all of these eggs are from the spawning of the one female. She was greatly swollen and excited with unusual behaviour in the morning of that day. Another female was thin, and I think (but  I cannot be sure) she was not involved into spawning. It is likely the egg productivity of a one sewellia is pretty high.

S-marmorata-eggs.jpgImage Enlarger

 Fry have great appetite, but grow very-very slowly.

December 4, 2016
1:42 pm
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olly
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torso said
How do you breed them?

I did nothing special. A year ago S.marmorata were young, now one female became gravid. That is great that parents were synchronized. I did not see their spawning (only gravid excited female in the morning and later eggs and dominant male with high frequency of breath and high heart rate), and I was not sure that eggs were fertilized. But fry appeared 🙂

December 4, 2016
6:46 pm
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Plaamoo
Bellingham, Washington U.S.A.
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Good stuff Olly! How do you spot the eggs in the substrate?

Charles, I hope the move goes well. Moving is a special nightmare for us fishkeepers!

December 10, 2016
8:44 pm
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olly
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Thank you Jim!

I think I returned at home at the moment of the end of S.Marmorata spawning. The eggs were still on the substrate (the first picture above), and they were not eaten yet. I guess that the light in the tank interrupted the spawning. The Sewellia's eggs are very adhesive and they were glued to the substrate.

December 12, 2016
4:15 pm
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Plaamoo
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Ah I see in the pic you have no substrate. It's a bare-bottom tank. I have sand in my lineolata tank, the granules are similar size to the eggs. That's likely why I've never seen them. 🙂 I find the tiny fry in the water change bucket.

December 13, 2016
9:27 pm
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torso
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olly said
 The Sewellia's eggs are very adhesive and they were glued to the substrate.

It is likely the egg productivity of a one sewellia is pretty

That's interesting Olly. S. lineolata-eggs are at first adhesive too - not very strong - and loose it within some hours. (Frank Strozyk in AMAZONAS 2010)

Only numbers for the quantity of eggs for S. lineolata date from 2010 (Frank Strozyk in AMAZONAS): 1459 within a month.

Cheers Charles

December 18, 2016
11:00 am
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olly
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You are likely right Jim.

Plaamoo said
 🙂 I find the tiny fry in the water change bucket.

It is great and my congratulations. I like S.lineolata and cannot imagine my tank without them. Amazing fish with interesting behavior.

December 18, 2016
11:25 am
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olly
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Thank you for very interesting facts Charles.

Are such quantity of eggs from one S.lineolata female or from a group (how many?) in this paper? What is the size of S.lineolata female and how many eggs do female release during the one spawning? It is interesting to compare. I didn't see the new spawnings in my group of S.marmorata for 1,5 months.

Unfortunately I didn't watch for the changes in S.marmorata egg adhesiveness. It is interesting why initially adhesive eggs lost their ability to glue within some hours. Fixation of eggs on the open surfaces makes them vulnerable and elevates the chance to be eaten.
Is this temporary adhesion of eggs on surfaces necessary for fertilization? Eggs of many fishes fall into gravel and they are succesfully fertilized. Or are much oxygen required in first hours of sewellia embryo development? Is something known about that or please share your ideas?

December 19, 2016
4:04 pm
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olly
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 One more idea about temporary adhesiveness of sewellia eggs. The egg ability to glue may prove to be a method for the spreading to new river and for trip by air on legs and feathers of aquatic birds (or insects) to new locations. That may be a cause of appearance of fish in remote region. Such method of migration by air on birds is known in the case of Pungitius platygaster aralehsis. It is likely our hillstream loaches, being in eggs, enjoy such air trips, and later we consider the fishes of one species that were found in distant locations as different species.

Just a guess.

December 19, 2016
7:15 pm
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torso
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Hi Olly

He had a group aof 5,5. You want the article (German)?

I remember a remark in "Borneo-Suckers" about the counting of follicles in a Gastromyzon-female (Slechtova ?) with some thousends.

I think, it's just a question of fertilizing/surviving.

About spreading: if you were right, "adhesive" species should be wider spread. Doesn't match with S. marmorata (found in Vinh-Than-River only) and is contradictory to the widespread S. lineolata.

A guess: S. lineolata is found in trubid and calmer water. May be it developped a less "sticking" method for different conditions. S. marmorat was found in turbid water only.

Cheers Charles

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