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Water Changes
February 21, 2011
9:51 pm
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JazzBora150
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since i started keeping tank fish a few months ago ive been changing my water religiously on a sunday (pun intended)
since my water temp is 25 degrees C and my room temp is rarely above 18 degrees C
ive been using water from the shower which is heated by gas boiler
i turn it down to the lowest it can go which is about 30 degrees C then add a little cold water to obtain desired temp
my question is : is the water chemistry changed by heating the water thru the boiler and
will it adversely affect fish ?

thx

martin

February 21, 2011
10:50 pm
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MatsP
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It probably depends on lots of factors.

There are people who say "don't use hot water in your tank". They claim that the water will contain copper - which may be true if you live in really soft water areas. In hard water areas, it's unlikely to make much of a difference.

I do use hot water from the kitchen tap, have done [or the bathroom].

I also use RO water - for a lot of my tanks, it's only RO water which is heated with an aquarium heater...

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Mats

February 22, 2011
8:48 am
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keith565
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i have to agree to some extent with MatsP, however, i never do water changes on a weekend, only Tuesday to Friday as i was once told by a water board employee that some companies dump loads of extra chemicals into the water over a weekend as usage drops when all the offices/schools etc are closed and that increases the risk of bacterial blooms in pipes to said premises. not sure how true it is but i won't risk trying it.
i use water straight from my taps, hot and cold mixer. i add water condition to some tanks (those containing more sensitive fish), others get plain tap water. have always done this with no problems.
as for changing water chemistry, yes it has to, the temp will alter pH, the higher the temp the lower the pH and visa versa (i might have it the wrong way round)lol. my pH pen takes temp into account when reading pH levels.

February 22, 2011
3:16 pm
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Sonny Disposition
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As everyone said, depending on the chemistry of the water you start with, the hot water heater could affect the water by the time you put it in your tank.

Do your fish act differently after a water change, or seem to be impaired?

The water from our local water authority is pretty consistent. I do large weekly water changes on some of my tanks (80 to 90 percent) straight from the tap, and I adjust the temperature by balancing the hot and cold faucets. I've done this for years, and so far, the fish seem fine.

QUOTE (JazzBora150 @ Feb 21 2011, 04:34 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
since i started keeping tank fish a few months ago ive been changing my water religiously on a sunday (pun intended)
since my water temp is 25 degrees C and my room temp is rarely above 18 degrees C
ive been using water from the shower which is heated by gas boiler
i turn it down to the lowest it can go which is about 30 degrees C then add a little cold water to obtain desired temp
my question is : is the water chemistry changed by heating the water thru the boiler and
will it adversely affect fish ?

thx

martin

February 22, 2011
7:04 pm
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Eyrie
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My understanding is that for older houses with a hot water tank there was concern about the water sitting and absorbing potential nasties from the pipe work, but with a combi-boiler the water is heated on demand from the mains and so this isn't an issue.

I use both taps to get the water to a similar temperature to the tank before refilling, and err on the cooler side. With some species a change using cooler water may trigger spawning as it emulates the rainy season. I'd think this is less applicable when a species has been captive bred for many generations however.

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February 22, 2011
7:11 pm
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Steve Waring
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My RO unit is in my garage, and the water from there can be very cold. I find a simple way to warm it up quickly is to put some in a glass jug and zap it in the microwave, then mix it back with the rest of the RO water I am using.

February 23, 2011
1:11 pm
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Bluedave
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I wouldn't worry too much about the temperature of the water (i.e. using water from the cold tap) if your only changing small amounts - the fish won't be too worried and in some it may even initiate spawning etc.

With regards contaminants - yes in old houses you may get traces of all sorts from your pipework - is it enough to do any harm - probably not.

I would have thought that only a very big change in temperature would affect pH significantly?

pH of pure water at Room temp(25 C) and pressure (approx atmos pressure) (RTP) is 7. I know that the higher the temp the lower the pH (a bugger in heating systems.....), thinks it's something like at 60 degrees the pH drops to 6.8 and at 4 degrees it rises to 7.4?

March 4, 2011
1:18 pm
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Steve Waring
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QUOTE (Bluedave @ Feb 23 2011, 12:54 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
pH of pure water at Room temp(25 C) and pressure (approx atmos pressure) (RTP) is 7. I know that the higher the temp the lower the pH (a b*gg*r in heating systems.....), thinks it's something like at 60 degrees the pH drops to 6.8 and at 4 degrees it rises to 7.4?


Hi Bluedave. that's interesting. Is this because water that has had no CO2 added to it absorbs CO2 from the atmosphere more when it is warm.

March 4, 2011
7:09 pm
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Bluedave
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I'm no chemist but I think it's to do with an increase in H+ ions as temperature increases - pH is a measure of H+ ions.

March 4, 2011
11:29 pm
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MatsP
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QUOTE (Bluedave @ Mar 4 2011, 06:52 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm no chemist but I think it's to do with an increase in H+ ions as temperature increases - pH is a measure of H+ ions.

I wouldn't think that's generally true. But some weak acids (and alkalines/bases) may indeed be temperature dependant. And of course, the reagent/meter may be temperature sensitive...

I think CO2 is one of those "weak acids".

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Mats

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