LOGIN

RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube
GLOSSARY       

SEARCHGLOSSARY

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

PROFILESEARCH

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





 

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Yasuhikotakia spp.
April 15, 2011
7:28 am
Avatar
Matt
Málaga, Spain
Admin
Forum Posts: 8239
Member Since:
June 13, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Do these exhibit the same suite of behavioural quirks as Botia spp. i.e. 'shadowing', 'greying out', the 'loachy dance' (man that term bugs me /tongue.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":p" border="0" alt="tongue.gif" />) and resting at weird angles?

If it depends on the species some specifics would be great. /thumbs_up.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":thumbsup:" border="0" alt="thumbs_up.gif" />

Cake or death?
April 15, 2011
1:35 pm
Avatar
Plaamoo
Bellingham, Washington U.S.A.
Community Helper
Forum Posts: 1256
Member Since:
March 14, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

QUOTE
the 'loachy dance' (man that term bugs me tongue.gif)


/laugh.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid="Laugh" border="0" alt="laugh.gif" />

April 15, 2011
4:58 pm
Avatar
Bully
South Wales
Veteran
Forum Posts: 249
Member Since:
July 12, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Mark will be the one who can best answer as he has the biggest population on here as far as I'm aware. However, my Y. sidthimunki demonstrate all the traits you mention /smile.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":)" border="0" alt="smile.gif" />

Here's a poor video of two of my greyed out fish:

Also, one of my favourite pics from when the female got seriously big, I haven't posted it in a long time so using this as a golden opportunity /biggrin.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":D" border="0" alt="biggrin.gif" />

DoubleDeckerSidwithstriata.pngImage Enlarger

April 16, 2011
8:20 am
Avatar
Matt
Málaga, Spain
Admin
Forum Posts: 8239
Member Since:
June 13, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Cheers Gareth, and that is one enormo-female! /blink.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":blink:" border="0" alt="blink.gif" />

Did you know Y. sidthimunki and Y. nigrolineata have been found to be genetically distinct from the rest of the genus? Seems they might get their own genus at some point. /rolleyes.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":rolleyes:" border="0" alt="rolleyes.gif" />

QUOTE (plaamoo @ Apr 15 2011, 01:18 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
/laugh.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid="Laugh" border="0" alt="laugh.gif" />

What?? /biggrin.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":D" border="0" alt="biggrin.gif" />

So what about the other species?

Cake or death?
April 16, 2011
9:24 am
Avatar
Bully
South Wales
Veteran
Forum Posts: 249
Member Since:
July 12, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

QUOTE (Matt @ Apr 16 2011, 09:03 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
Did you know Y. sidthimunki and Y. nigrolineata have been found to be genetically distinct from the rest of the genus? Seems they might get their own genus at some point. /rolleyes.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":rolleyes:" border="0" alt="rolleyes.gif" />

I have read that somewhere for definite, was it on here?

I also want to re-read TDO's paper where he mentions the different B. striata as I want some clarification. I have a few in my tank that have not grown as big as their counterparts in nearly 5 years now, each of the smaller ones has a much blunter snout so I'm curious if there is a separation. I do have the paper, it's just a matter of motivation and time right now....which I won't have this fortnight whilst the kids are off /tongue.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":p" border="0" alt="tongue.gif" /> /biggrin.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":D" border="0" alt="biggrin.gif" />

April 16, 2011
1:17 pm
Avatar
andy rushworth
Veteran
Forum Posts: 502
Member Since:
August 27, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Interesting point about the Striatas Gareth , I suspect that the Indian Botias i.e Dario and Almorhaes have more complex's than we know too /thumbs_up.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":thumbsup:" border="0" alt="thumbs_up.gif" />

I have a tank with about 20 Striatas and as you say the growth rate seems quite variable , I also picked up mine in two groups !

I've always noticed that if you buy a group of Botias when small you end up with quite a variation in size , Histrionicas are a prime example , possibly to do with pecking orders /blink.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":blink:" border="0" alt="blink.gif" /> sexes ?

Interestingly the smaller/runts seem just as healthy and seem to live as long ?

B t w Gareth you still got all those wonderful Sids /wub.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":wub:" border="0" alt="wub.gif" />

April 16, 2011
6:36 pm
Avatar
Mark Duffill
Community Helper
Forum Posts: 1012
Member Since:
August 12, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

The Yasuhikotakia do all the things that the Botia species do but with a little more attitude /biggrin.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":D" border="0" alt="biggrin.gif" />

The difference in temperament and behaviour between sids and nigrolineata compared with other Yasuhikotakia is quite evident when groups are kept, they are way more placid and sociable compared to the other Yasuhikotakia species that are sociable but ther is always an element of attitude.

April 16, 2011
11:23 pm
Avatar
Bully
South Wales
Veteran
Forum Posts: 249
Member Since:
July 12, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Yep, still got the sids /smile.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":)" border="0" alt="smile.gif" /> I've actually thought about giving the freshwater tank up recently, and using it for a reef tank, I just can't seem to give up my loaches and Etroplus though.

April 17, 2011
12:28 pm
Avatar
ender2811
Veteran
Forum Posts: 161
Member Since:
March 10, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have a question about Y. sidthimunki. Would they be at home in a community tank housing Emp tetras, Cories, and a couple of dwarf cichlids? The profile suggests such a tank as suitable but was wondering if anyone had some first hand experience with a similar setup. How many would be enough in a group? Profile says 5 but, again, any other thoughts.

April 18, 2011
6:39 pm
Avatar
Mark Duffill
Community Helper
Forum Posts: 1012
Member Since:
August 12, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

The tetras etc would be fine but I have never had good results when sidthimunki have been in the same tank as cories, the dorsal fins of the cories tend to take some damage. I have never housed them with dwarf cichlids so cant comment.

May 18, 2011
1:02 pm
Avatar
Matt
Málaga, Spain
Admin
Forum Posts: 8239
Member Since:
June 13, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Does anyone have information regarding the current conservation status of Y. sidthimunki? Almost everywhere I look it says 'endangered' but it hasn't been assessed by the IUCN since 1996 and the species page on siamensis.org appears to say that it's already extinct in the wild, with fish recorded from a river in recent years likely to be escapees from a breeding farm...

Cake or death?
May 18, 2011
6:04 pm
Avatar
torso
Veteran
Forum Posts: 555
Member Since:
August 17, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

[quote name='Matt' date='Apr 16 2011, 08:03 AM' post='28209']
Did you know Y. sidthimunki and Y. nigrolineata have been found to be genetically distinct from the rest of the genus? Seems they might get their own genus at some point. /rolleyes.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":rolleyes:" border="0" alt="rolleyes.gif" />

wouldn't surprise me after all I can't worm up with the rest of the genus /rolleyes.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":rolleyes:" border="0" alt="rolleyes.gif" />
about sids as eye-eaters: does anybody have facts. in a forum here they restarted that nonsense: "they use to hunt snails at night and may confuse the eyes of cories with the prey ..." In a LFS I followed a strange customer advice about killer-sids. when I asked the geranl manager if she was aware to damage the reputation of the shop by selling killer-fish she looked like this /angry.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":angry:" border="0" alt="angry.gif" />
I have been keeping sids with cories and other critters for almost 30 years, no problems so far. apart of the breeding: just one youngster long time ago
you need pics, matt?

May 19, 2011
7:04 am
Avatar
Matt
Málaga, Spain
Admin
Forum Posts: 8239
Member Since:
June 13, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

QUOTE (torso @ May 18 2011, 06:47 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
they use to hunt snails at night and may confuse the eyes of cories with the prey

.... /blink.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":blink:" border="0" alt="blink.gif" />

Pics would be lovely please Charles. I have a few but more is always better!

Cake or death?
May 19, 2011
5:50 pm
Avatar
torso
Veteran
Forum Posts: 555
Member Since:
August 17, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
May 19, 2011
6:26 pm
Avatar
Matt
Málaga, Spain
Admin
Forum Posts: 8239
Member Since:
June 13, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Pretty much like that, yeah. /laugh.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid="Laugh" border="0" alt="laugh.gif" /> Thank you!

Cake or death?
May 21, 2011
1:38 pm
Avatar
Matt
Málaga, Spain
Admin
Forum Posts: 8239
Member Since:
June 13, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Ok I checked with Kamphol and he says that all records of Y. sidthimunki in the Mekong basin, and therefore Laos and Cambodia, are erroneous and instead refer to Y. nigrolineata. It's actually restricted to western Thailand and eastern Myanmar (presumably the Chao Phraya, Mae Klong and Salween drainages - awaiting confirmation on this), and is still alive and well in the wild, albeit in secret locations.

Cake or death?
May 21, 2011
5:04 pm
Avatar
Matt
Málaga, Spain
Admin
Forum Posts: 8239
Member Since:
June 13, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

So, it's found only the Mae Klong and Ataran drainages (thanks again Kamphol) meaning the normally-quoted type locality of 'Yom river', an upper tributary of the Chao Phraya, is wrong. This is borne out by the description which I managed to snag a copy of this week. Y. sidthimunki was described from specimens imported into Germany and in the paper the locality is given simply as 'North Thailand, in streams'. No mention of any Yom river!

Cake or death?
May 21, 2011
7:56 pm
Avatar
Bully
South Wales
Veteran
Forum Posts: 249
Member Since:
July 12, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Good work Matt, so is it safe to say that it's still endangered?

May 22, 2011
7:05 am
Avatar
Mark Duffill
Community Helper
Forum Posts: 1012
Member Since:
August 12, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I think from what I have found out from speaking to people it isnt widespread but not as "endangered" as it was, I think the good thing is that it is surviving and that it seems to be protected /smile.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":)" border="0" alt="smile.gif" />

May 22, 2011
8:27 am
Avatar
Bully
South Wales
Veteran
Forum Posts: 249
Member Since:
July 12, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

It's great news if that is the case Mark /smile.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":)" border="0" alt="smile.gif" />

Forum Timezone: Europe/Paris

Most Users Ever Online: 246

Currently Online:
1 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Devices in use: Desktop (1)

Top Posters:

Stefan: 1567

Plaamoo: 1256

mikev: 1134

Malti: 1099

Mark Duffill: 1012

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 0

Members: 30492

Moderators: 0

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 4

Forums: 10

Topics: 4603

Posts: 36639

Newest Members: Terry Lambert 50, Monjurul Hasan, Chuno1, reptilesforever, aofishstore

Administrators: dunc: 1323, Matt: 8239