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Evolution of body colouration in killifishes: Is male ornamentation constrained by intersexual genetic correlation?
January 18, 2014
11:08 am
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Matt
Málaga, Spain
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Zoologischer Anzeiger - article in press

Abstract

Sexual selection drives the evolution of exaggerated traits in males of many animal species. Nevertheless, the response to this selective pressure can be constrained by genetic correlation between sexes. This hypothesis predicts that costly ornamental structures selected for only in males appear also in females, at least because both sexes share most of their genomes. If a trait bears no fitness advantages to females, its expression should reflect a compromise between selection for hypertrophy in males and natural selection favouring reduction of ornamentation in females. Therefore, extravagant male ornaments should evolve predominantly under weak intersexual genetic correlation. Here, we explore the role and evolutionary stability of the constraint imposed by intersexual genetic correlation in the evolution of body colouration in three species-rich families of killifishes. Across most killifish lineages, the evolutionary changes in male and female variegation were correlated, which identifies intersexual genetic correlation as an important factor in the evolution of killifish colouration. Several lineages overcame the constraining intersexual genetic correlation and evolved extremely conspicuous colouration in males together with plain colouration in females. Hormonal manipulations in two species from closely related genera (Nothobranchius and Fundulopanchax) differing in magnitude of sexual dichromatism suggest that pronounced sexual dimorphism in variegation evolved via disappearance of vivid body colours in females and extension of androgen-linked vivid colouration over body surface in males.

Cake or death?
January 20, 2014
5:54 pm
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Stefan
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Do you have this Matt?

January 21, 2014
6:07 pm
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Matt
Málaga, Spain
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Sent. :)

Cake or death?
January 21, 2014
7:13 pm
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Stefan
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January 29, 2012
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Cheers Matt :) I'll enjoy this one, it seems to tap into a topic I've often wondered about.

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