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Heated Competition: How Climate Change Will Affect Non-native Pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus And Native Perch Perca fluviatilis Interactions In The U.K.
November 9, 2011
9:14 am
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Matt
Málaga, Spain
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Abstract

Heated and ambient temperature experimental ponds were used to examine competition between introduced pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus and native perch Perca fluviatilis in England, U.K., and how these interactions are likely to change under climate warming conditions. Results from three sets of two-week experiments indicated that in both species and in all sets, growth was faster in heated than in ambient temperature ponds. Growth of both P. fluviatilis and L. gibbosus in sympatry did not differ significantly from that observed in allopatric ponds. Diet analysis indicated that increased resource partitioning occurred when P. fluviatilis and L. gibbosus were reared in sympatry, with P. fluviatilis shifting to a diet higher in microcrustaceans. The results do not support the previous claims of adverse effects of L. gibbosus on P. fluviatilis populations. Under conditions of climate change, however, which have been demonstrated experimentally to enhance L. gibbosus recruitment, this species is expected to become invasive in England, resulting in higher densities that may exert a stronger competitive effect than examined in this study.

Cake or death?
November 9, 2011
9:41 pm
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coelacanth
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In the one fishery I've been to that had Pumpkinseeds (it was for a species race, I wouldn't normally demean myself!), they were present in ridiculous numbers, and handful of bait thrown on the surface resulted in a frenzy. This was down near Bristol which has a slightly milder climate than here, but I can easily imagine them getting established in most of the UK. This was a fishery with lots of carp which you'd imagine would predate sunfish nests, but the damn things were superabundant. I have heard of one fishery where they got established having to be netted and then rotenoned to get rid.
Very pretty, full of character, but not in natural waters over here.

November 9, 2011
9:49 pm
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Colin
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you think they would survive the last couple of winters we have had? Any idea what they can survive down to or how long?

It's one of the things that grates on me about having to have a bloody Channa license in Scotland when I doubt even argus would survive a year up here let alone breed!

November 9, 2011
10:49 pm
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Matt
Málaga, Spain
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They're everywhere here, probably more than one species too. /rolleyes.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":rolleyes:" border="0" alt="rolleyes.gif" />

Cake or death?
November 9, 2011
11:21 pm
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Matt
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By the way, anyone want the paper?

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November 9, 2011
11:40 pm
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coelacanth
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QUOTE (Colin @ Nov 9 2011, 09:32 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
you think they would survive the last couple of winters we have had? Any idea what they can survive down to or how long?

I've watched 'Seeds on the nest in eastern Canada where even the last two Winters would be mild by comparison (although different in duration). The fishery in question has had them since before the extreme weather, and going off the size and numbers I was catching, they made it through both years without a problem.

QUOTE
It's one of the things that grates on me about having to have a bloody Channa license in Scotland when I doubt even argus would survive a year up here let alone breed!

The main worry with Channa as far as I can tell is the possibility of tranference of certain disease nasties that might do rather well in our lower riverine and estuarine (and therefore nursery) habitats in a warm year, but I think aquarium fish are fairly low on the list of potential vectors, fish from Bangladesh are imported frozen for food from exactly these same areas of concern in large numbers.

p.s. Matt, yes, I'd like a read

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