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Request: Proterocara argentina, A New Fossil Cichlid
June 13, 2011
6:35 pm
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Stefan
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PROTEROCARA ARGENTINA, A NEW FOSSIL CICHLID FROM THE LUMBRERA FORMATION, EOCENE OF ARGENTINA

http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/......1671/0272...FC%5D2.0.CO%3B2

June 13, 2011
9:02 pm
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Matt
Málaga, Spain
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June 13, 2011
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Will send you in the am - Adobe on Google Chrome not working at the moment for some reason.

Cake or death?
June 13, 2011
9:27 pm
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Stefan
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Cheers for that!

June 17, 2011
2:12 pm
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Stefan
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Does anyone else want it? I have it now.

June 20, 2011
5:25 pm
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Graham Ramsay
Blairgowrie - UK
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If I'm reading this correctly the age of this species is "early eocene" which would be about 50 million years old?

At that time Africa and S. America were already well apart. The origin of the cichlid family is widely believed to be Africa so this species has already either crossed the young S. Atlantic or has evolved from species that did so.

The Phylogenetic tree shows it be nested firmly within the extant S. American fishes which suggestes (to me) that a fair amount of cichlid evolution had already taken place in S. America by the time this fish was preserved in the mud of a S. American lake.

Is this a reasonable view?

June 21, 2011
10:20 pm
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Stefan
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You raise an interesting point. I have not read the paper yet so unfortunately I cannot comment yet on that view.

July 10, 2011
9:50 am
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Graham Ramsay
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This paper argues for a much earlier divergence of the S. American, African and Malagasy/Indian cichlids. Far enough back (120mya) to allow for vicariant divergance during the time when Africa and S. America were first drifting apart. (Still an issue with the Malagasy/Indian split though).

I've always thought this much more likely than a subsequent trans oceanic dispersal (or even multiple dispersals). Would be nice to find some early fossils mind you.

July 11, 2011
6:26 pm
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Stefan
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I like the points you raise; as soon as I've read it (fossil paper) I'll join the discussion /smile.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":)" border="0" alt="smile.gif" />

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