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Filter too strong
May 19, 2015
9:02 am
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Deakin15
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April 20, 2015
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I've been out of the fish game for a couple of years but I'm now back and have recently done a fishless cycle on a 55 litre Aqua One Aqua Nano tank which is a rather nice little 40cm cube.  However, the filtration isn't ideal, its very powerful and a bit too strong for several of the fish I'd like to add.  The filtration is in it's own compartment at the back of the tank, very neat and aesthetically pleasing, but it's blowing my Galaxies all over the place, 4 of the 5 actually ended up in the back which is approx 40cm x 5cm and I lost one in rescuing them.  I've now put a bit of old fish net over the outlet holes to stop the fish blowing through again.

As the maximum width/depth is only 40cm I thought I'd stick to smallish fish like Galaxies and Ember Tetras with some Aspidoras for bottom feeders, but now it looks as if I'll have to get something a bit bigger and have been looking and researching fish and would really like either Nannostomus marginatus picturatus (Dwarf pencilfish) or Microrasbora erythromicron (Emerald Dwarf Rasbora) but both require practically still filtration.

I could either change the filtration in the tank, would an air powered sponge filter be powerful enough?  Or choose a different fish which likes fast moving water, in which case I'd be very grateful for any suggestions for me to research.  

May 19, 2015
12:44 pm
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coelacanth
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If the filter is as shown in this manual http://www.aquaone.co.uk/docum.....ctions.pdf, I'd just carefully drill more holes below the slots marked "3" to about 1/2 the depth of the filter unit, and also on the upper area of the right-hand face. This will spread the intake over a larger area, giving gentler flow into the filter.
You could also look at the outlet, and with some pipe offcuts and a small drill bit you could create a short spray bar to disperse the return flow.

May 19, 2015
4:23 pm
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Byron Hosking
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Finding fish that will manage with a continual strong current is not easy, and especially in smaller tanks.  The Hillstream loaches (Beaufortia kweichowensis, B. cyclica, B. szechuanensis) come to mind, but the tank lengths for these in the profiles are longer than 40cm.  We had a thread on these fish a couple of months back, with a video of a member's setup that may help if you can track it down.

Coelacanth's suggestions are ways to diffuse a strong flow, but the remaining water movement may still be too much.  So to answer your question, yes, a sponge filter would be well suited to this sized tank.  I have a dual sponge filter on my 29g and 20g, and a single sponge on my 10g, and they are more than sufficient.  The species mentioned in your post would be fine with this.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA Vancouver, BC Canada
May 20, 2015
2:27 am
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Matt
Málaga, Spain
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Where on earth does the filter sit on that tank?

Cake or death?
May 20, 2015
9:05 am
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Deakin15
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If you look at the link coelcanth put on, the picture on page 5, that is the filter compartment which is at the back of the tank and covers the whole width 40xm and is approx 5cm deep.  The pump (marked 1) is at the top and it's this that's causing the powerful flow, I have a small Cryptocorene planted at the front of the tank and it's always moving about, so the flow must be pretty strong all over the tank.  The fish have been sucked out of the inlet holes, marked 3 on the diagram.  The back compartment is also sectioned off so there's no danger of the fish being drawn into the section with the heater and pump in.

I've been looking at sponge air filters but think they'd be too big to fit into the back.  It's a nice little tank, I'm really pleased with it but the fish seem to be hiding near the bottom amongst the plants most of the time.

May 20, 2015
4:22 pm
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Matt
Málaga, Spain
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No way to add additional holes as per Coelacanth's suggestion, or swap out the pump for a less powerful model?

Cake or death?
May 20, 2015
4:44 pm
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Deakin15
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April 20, 2015
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I'm still looking into sponge filters, I'm also going to get in touch with Aqua One to see if they can come up with any suggestions how to turn this pump down, maybe if I got a pump for a smaller tank it would be OK.

Thanks for suggestions, it looks as if this problem will be ongoing for quite a while 

May 20, 2015
5:36 pm
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coelacanth
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Adult Galaxies do hide anyway, they're little swines for it. Babies bod about in open water, but as soon as they get pretty, they're gone! We have a display aquarium of 20 gallons or so, there are probably a good several dozen in there, but all you can usually see until feeding time are the half-a-dozen or so juveniles that are growing up in there at any one time. The aquarium is filtered with a sponge filter and a treatment pod with coral gravel just to buffer it slightly, so there is little flow.

May 21, 2015
7:39 am
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Deakin15
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April 20, 2015
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I remembered that you could adjust the powerhead so looked on You Tube and there was a great video on there.  The switch is at the bottom of the powerhead which was very awkward to get at and, because of my arthritic hands, I couldn't remove the tube that goes through into the main tank.  The video suggested turning the powerhead upside down as it's very near the top and condensation means constant topping up to stop the powerhead getting air in, I eventually managed to do this and turn the flow down slightly, it's still quite strong, but I think I'll give it a try.  Whilst doing this I cut up a big black net which I've had for years and can't remember using, and fixed at the back of the tank to stop the fish going through the intake holes.  The video suggested wedging a large filter sponge into the compartment behind the intake holes, so I'll look into that as well.

Thanks again for your help 

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