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Quarantine Tanks
May 29, 2015
8:28 pm
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Gaina
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March 8, 2015
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I hope I'm putting this in the right section :).

I'm a long way off getting my next batch of fish but I thought it best to start thinking about quarantine tanks now so I'm properly prepared. I have a few questions:

 

Minimum size?
Pump?
Does it need to 'cycle' before I put new fish in it? How long for?
Bare or gravelled/planted?
 
Any other comments or advice that I have not covered in these questions would be gratefully received!
 
Thanks :)
May 30, 2015
3:03 am
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Plaamoo
Bellingham, Washington U.S.A.
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Size of fish dictates size of tank but smaller is better. I mostly use 10gallon tanks. Bare bottom with just a rock or two for hides. I keep at least one cycled and ready.

May 30, 2015
9:26 pm
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Byron Hosking
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I concur with Plaamoo if you are thinking of a QT that will only be running as needed, as opposed to permanently.

I will just describe my method, which works for me because I have a dedicated fish room so I keep a 20g tank permanently running that is used just to quarantine new fish for several weeks.  It has a sand substrate, some plants (culls from the other tanks), a couple chunks of rock and wood for cover purposes, and thick with floating plants both for water quality and reducing overhead light.  Sponge filter, and heater.  This tank as I say runs permanently, and can be empty of fish for a year or even longer.  The advantage of this is that I have not only a cycled tank but an established one for new acquisitions, and this does make quite a difference especially with my usually wild-caught and more delicate fish.  Fortunately I've never had to treat fish in QT, knock on wood, but if I did I realize the plants would likely be tossed as many medications will decimate them anyway.  Sand is very inexpensive to replace after any treatments.

I consider a hospital tank for treating disease on my long-standing fish a very different thing, and only once have I needed it (for pop-eye) but it is a 10g bare except for a wood-like decor that can be disinfected.  Fish in completely bare tanks will be severely stressed which when they are fighting off a disease only makes things more difficult.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA Vancouver, BC Canada
June 6, 2015
5:44 pm
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Gaina
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March 8, 2015
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Thanks

 for the replies, sorry I took a while to respond but I didn't get email notification of this thread.

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