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Re-planting tank,
June 29, 2015
8:01 pm
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Gaina
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I have started the slow process of evicting the Amazon Sword from my tank and rethinking my planting scheme.  I have the following in my tank at the moment:

 

Lysimachia Nummularia - back left corner

Anubias Coffeefolia - front left corner

Echinodorus blheri - covering 3/4 if back wall (end just short of filter in back right corner of tank)

Echinodorius harbii Rosa x 3 - midground

Echinodorus ozelot Red - front right corner.

 

If this sounds like a whole lotta plants, it is!  I have read that the growth of E.Harbii and E ozelot is dependent on the amount of light available and I'm wondering if I should gradually remove those too and replace them with a carpeting plant.  I have seen some Marimo for sale in a few aquatic plant shops online and like the look of it but wanted to be sure everything I buy will be suitable for my Rasbora and easy to maintain.  I'm also aware that I need a floating plant to give my fish the muted light they like.

 

EDIT -  forgot to say my tank is 65 litres (UK).

 

Many thanks for your advice :)

June 30, 2015
3:52 pm
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Byron Hosking
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All three Echinodorus species are actually a bit large for a 65 litre (17 gallon) tank, though it is true that environmental conditions (light and nutrients) will affect the growth rate and appearance of plants in this genus.  This is one reason why there are so many "species" which are in fact not distinct species but variants of a species.  I have had the common sword (E. bleherae [E. bleheri is a mis-spelling, from Rataj's original description] which botanically is actually E. grisebachii as E. bleherae is not a valid species according to the DNA phylogenetic studies) attain 20 inches in my larger tanks but remain around 10 inches in smaller for some time.  But nevertheless, these will likely get too large to be aesthetically pleasing in a small tank.

Marimo moss balls are actually not moss but a form of cladophora algae.  I've never had these, but from what I've read I believe they manage in most lighting.  Your true carpet-type plants will be more demanding in the area of lighting, and with increased lighting comes increased nutrients.  I personally would prefer keeping the lighting less for forest fish such as rasbora, and floating plants are certainly a good idea.  So with this in mind, perhaps a better lower plant would be some of the crypts, or the pygmy chain sword Helanthium tenellum [previously considered in the Echinodorus genus and still frequently seen as Echinodorus tenellus].  I consider this an ideal plant for smaller tanks, as it is not too fussy about light, and once settled will send out runners and literally carpet the substrate; these are easy to remove as they appear to keep some "open" areas as you prefer.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA Vancouver, BC Canada
June 30, 2015
5:39 pm
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Gaina
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20150630_150417-1.jpgImage Enlarger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20150630_150425-1.jpgImage Enlarger

 

Hi Byron thanks for the advice :).

I've tried to upload some photos of my tank as it is right now but they seem to be disappearing!

I forgot to as about Hair Grass. I was thinking of replacing the sword I'm taking out of my tank with that as it seems to be easier to maintain and I've noticed in photographs I've seen that it does tend to curl over at the top to mute light in the tank if you let it grow.

June 30, 2015
7:31 pm
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Byron Hosking
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Two of the photos came through.  I would probably leave the tall swords in the back, they may stay about this size for some time; mine did.

Hairgrass I have not tried.  Make sure it is the true aquatic species, such as those in the genus Eleocharis.  There is the dwarf hairgrass, Eleocharis acicularis.  I have seen terrestrial plants under this common name. 

Corkscrew Vallisneria, the smaller plant species, might work.  You could also try it, and if it settles and spreads, remove the larger swords as the Vall becomes the background.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA Vancouver, BC Canada
July 1, 2015
2:49 am
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Des
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I notice that you have mounted your heater vertically. Ideally it should be at an angle of 35 to 45 degrees . If it is in the flow of water from the filter even better.

Your Anubias Coffeefolia is an epiphyte and should not be planted in the gravel. It ought to be attached to a rock or piece of wood. You can use cotton thread or an elastic band to hold it in place until it grows in place.

July 6, 2015
7:42 pm
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Gaina
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Des said
I notice that you have mounted your heater vertically. Ideally it should be at an angle of 35 to 45 degrees . If it is in the flow of water from the filter even better.
Your Anubias Coffeefolia is an epiphyte and should not be planted in the gravel. It ought to be attached to a rock or piece of wood. You can use cotton thread or an elastic band to hold it in place until it grows in place.

I didn't know that about the Anubias, thank you!

I just followed the manufacturer's positioning instructions on the filter.  Have you got an example pic of how I should have it set up?

Thanks :)

July 6, 2015
9:45 pm
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Des
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July 11, 2015
10:59 pm
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Gaina
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Hi Des,

Sorry, scratch what I just wrote, we were at cross-purposes.   My water temperature is always constant throughout the tank, and yes it's in the direct flow of the water :)

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