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Algae Removal

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Algae Removal

This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Sirkus 10 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #299346

    _13k
    Member

    Hi

    #304109

    dunc
    Keymaster

    Loads of things which affect algae growth mate.

    The four most common issues with algae growth, especially in goldfish aquaria, are as follows:

    1 – artificial lighting. How long do you leave your tank lights on for? I would recommend no more than 8 hours a day; 6 if there aren’t any live plants in the tank.
    2 – sunlight. Is your aquarium in direct sunlight? If so, would it be possible to shield it from the sunlight in some way?
    3 – plants. If you have live plants in the aquarium, they will compete for oxygen with the algae and thus help keep it at bay. Goldfish will tend to eat/uproot most live plants, but you could throw some floating coldwater plants like Cabomba in.
    4 – overfeeding. How often do you feed your fish? Cut the feeding down – goldfish don’t need to be fed more than once a day unless you’re specifically trying to power their growth. If you enjoy feeding them, then seriously cut down the amount you feed. You should never feed more than the fish can eat within 2 minutes, but if you’re feeding multiple times per day, you’re talking pinches of flakes.

    What brand of fish food do you use?

    #304110

    _13k
    Member

    1 – The light goes on when it gets dark, and goes off when I go to bed, probly about 5 or 6 hours at most
    2 – I have a whole wall of glass in my flat, can’t really stop the sunlight
    3 – I have one plant in that grows quite nicely, I clipped it and made another one for the other side of the tank. How big are the floating plants?
    4 – I feed them twice a day but I don’t give them too much.

    What brand of fish food do you use?

    Just the blue round box, flakes that you usually get free with the tank etc.

    #304111

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Hi mate. Adding more plants will certainly help. These will suck up any excess nitrates in the water (basically the stuff that feeds the algae). Try fast-growing species like Hygrophilia or Indian fern. As Dunc said, floating plants will also help as they grow quickly and help to cut down the light entering the tank. Your regime of 5 or 6 hours of light is fine. A couple more questions:

    How often do you change some of the water in the tank?
    Can you describe the algae you have growing (colour, form etc). This will help us to analyse why you’re getting excessive growth, as different types of algae tend to thrive in different conditions.

    Cheers

    Matt

    #304112

    _13k
    Member

    I change the water every couple of weeks or so, bout 30%. The algae is green and is quite stubborn to get off the glass. The sponges don’t really work I have to scrape it off.

    It’s probably that I have too many fish, I know some places say goldfish need like 100000 gallons on their own to be happy, but I don’t want a boring tank.

    You’ll all probly say this is way to many /smile.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:)” border=”0″ alt=”smile.gif” /> )

    Thank tank is about a 60 gallon ish I think

    #304114

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Yep, you’re overstocked

    #304115

    dunc
    Keymaster

    Goldfish produce an awful lot of waste and will eat literally anything they’re given.

    I don’t suppose you have the space for a small pond do you, 13k? Your goldfish could go in there and you could convert your indoor aquarium to a tropical tank.

    If you want to stick with the aquarium, I would consider taking a few of the goldfish back to your local fish shop. They’ll usually take them off your hands for free. As Matt mentioned, I’d certainly increase the frequency of water changes to help keep nitrates down.

    #304116

    _13k
    Member

    live in a flat sop no pond /smile.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:)” border=”0″ alt=”smile.gif” />

    #304119

    Sirkus
    Member

    although this isnt a cure to the problem but certainly deals with it for a week or so, you could use a a razorblade to scrape off what sounds like green ‘spot’ algae? its stubborn as you mentioned and seems to get harder and harder to remove? razorblades take care of this nicely (http://www.pets-warehouse.com/Vpasp/shopexd.asp?id=113015) some are sharp though so watch your fingers but more importantly the silicone! (the kent one is blunt but very effective and doesn’t rust- cheap ones tend to be neither these)

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