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Aulonocara albino Strawberry

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Aulonocara albino Strawberry

This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  nuchal man 7 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #300820

    Jarcave
    Participant

    I picked a few of these up today. Can anyone confirm if they’re line bred Aulonocara stuartgranti or hybrids please?

    A couple of pics, sorry I used a crap camera and they’re in a quarantine tank which needs cleaning externally for the next couple of weeks or so.

    So, can anyone confirm if they’re line bred or hybrids?

    Attached files

    #318587

    nuchal man
    Participant

    I’d say they are a linebred hybrid. This fish goes around by a few names, Dragon Blood, Aulonocara Firefish. I’ve not seen anything stating how exactly this fish was created other than it originated in I believe Asia. I think it’s hard pressed to find a cichlid enthusiast who would tell you this fish is not of hybrid origin.

    #318588

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Hey Jared I’ve pasted the pics into the thread for you as all I could see was three lines of text, trust it’s ok.

    Nice to see you on here by the way, been a while.

    #318592

    Jarcave
    Participant

    Hi Matt, been far too long.

    #318598

    nuchal man
    Participant

    They kind of breed true from the ones I’ve seen. I work at a pet shop and this is a popular fish so we get them in a lot, so this is only from the ones I’ve seen. Personally, I hate hybrids. I think this is a hybrid that they’ve fixed through a bunch of line breeding. There is some variation in male coloration from what I’ve seen of males sold in the same batch, but you can tell it’s A strawberry, dragon blood, whatever you want to call it peacock. Honestly, I wouldn’t be surprised if we have a few fish going by this name that were created from different peacock hybrids of similar peacocks that have all been line bred and look relatively similar. Hopefully that last line made some sense.

    #318600

    Jarcave
    Participant

    Thats the aquatics trade for you. Every species has to have at least 5 trade names. Googlr leopard catfish and see what comes up! You’ll get everything from Cories to RTC x TSN hybrids! A supplier of mine often has the latter on their stock lists as nothing more than “leopard catfish” £2.89. More than one fish shop has expected it to be an L number too! lol

    I’ve found a few people who state they’re hybrids. But no one has so far managed to tell me what species were used to make them. Does anyone know if Aulonocara cross easily? It’s a genus I have very little experience with so any advice would be welcome.

    #318602

    torso
    Participant

    it’s: aulonocara albino, cultiivated form, as “Albino-Fire Fish” or “Dragon Blood Albino” on the lists, treated with hormons about 6 weeks before shipment to get that colour. in a tank they change back to no colour. females are not fertile because of the hormons. origin is mostly thailand
    that’s a shame, sorry to say that.
    edit: they are hybrids. the species are not known.

    #318622

    nuchal man
    Participant

    Yes, they hybridize extremely easily. There are a few different species groups of Aulonocara, but many of the fish, although male coloration is quite different, have females that look identical, especially the common species in the trade.

    I’d have to disagree slightly with Torso’s post. I do believe that some are hormoned, but not all of them. I’ve seen them spawn in the shop and they have spit out fry. I’d also disagree that all hormoned fish can’t have viable spawns and think it depends on what hormones and methods you use. A friend of mine who sells a lot of Victorain cichlids and wild peacocks and before he sells them, he actually uses low doses of hormones on females to match them with the males of the correct species, because a lot of female Aulonocara look quite similar. Of course, he doesn’t sell these fish before they turn back into their standard condition. These fish successfully breed after being hormoned.

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