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Austria 2011

Home Forums Field Trips & Conservation Austria 2011

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  poshsouthernbird 6 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 55 total)
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  • #301461

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Might have to split this thread if it gets too pic-heavy, but here are a selection from my trip.

    So I flew into Vienna on Saturday 28th May and was collected at the airport by Michael Köck from the Haus des Meeres. After a quick stop at my digs we headed to the Schönbrunn Zoo (thanks also to them for sorting the hotel out) to have a look at their fish displays and, more excitingly, Aphanius breeding programme which is off-limits to the general public.

    Displays of native species outside the aquarium-house:

    This one houses the European mud minnow Umbra krameri, tree frog Hyla arborea and fire-bellied toad Bombina bombina, all three of which were on the hit-list to see in the wild over the following few days:

    Some shots of the breeding programme for endangered species which is based in a dedicated room underneath the public part of the aquarium. Most of these tanks house Aphanius but there are also several species of Cyprinodon, Characodon, Crenichthys, Fundulus, and other bits and bobs such as Cualac tesselatus, Valencia letourneuxi and Astatotilapia flavijosephii. Very, very cool!!!:

    Cualac tank:

    Phreatichthys andruzzii is an interesting hypogean cyprinid native to a small area in Somalia and must be kept in very warm conditions:

    This pool outside contains a large breeding population of Valencia letourneuxi, a highly-endangered killifish from western Greece and Albania:

    Unfortunately my contact at the zoo had to cancel at the last minute due to family matters so we rearranged our meeting and Mike and I decided to go and have a look at the ‘Wienfluss’ (Vienna River), a short tributary of the Danube that’s famous for rapid variations in flow. It’s still dangerous and there are warning signs with speakers along certain stretches. Within the city it’s been heavily-modified as a result but not far outside is clean and holds quite a few fish species.

    I’d left my photo tank in the hotel so sorry about the pics. We found juveniles of Cottus gobio and Barbatula barbatula (?)… :

    …and Phoxinus phoxinus.

    The spot we sampled:

    Attached files

    #343780

    ender2811
    Participant

    Sounds like a nice trip. Is the breeding program part of a repopulation attempt or are they planing to keep the species in house.
    Schonbrunn is a cool place. Been there twice, loved it. Ask your friends if they could use a couple of biotech engineers. Will work for food

    #343782

    Stefan
    Member

    Great Matt – looks like you’ve had fun!

    #343783

    Thomas
    Member

    Thanks for sharing, Matt. Looks very interesting especially the small Cottus and Barbatula (for me).

    But where is my Cobitis?

    #343784

    Menu
    Participant

    Wonderful stuff Matt!
    Nice that you found some endemic species.

    #343787

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Cheers everyone, and this was only the first day so plenty more to come once I’ve worked through the other photos.

    #343797

    Senor Bastardo
    Participant

    Great pics Matt!

    That Somalian cyprinid was reallly something got any more info on that?

    #343799

    oaken
    Participant

    That place looks amazing!

    #343816

    Bluedave
    Participant

    you lucky, lucky barsteward!

    looking forward to the next installment of photo’s.

    #343817

    keith565
    Participant

    wow, amazing. can’t wait for installment 2

    #343826

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Great trip & accounting Matt! I bet you were in heaven!

    #343831

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Yep Jim, you guess right. Aphanius sirhani and make regular trips abroad to check the status of native habitats. If necessary fish will always be available for reintroduction purposes.

    – Krister, don’t know much about the Phreatichthys other than that they came from another zoo who did breed them which is now the plan at Vienna. Will try to obtain more info.

    – Thomas you will see your loach shortly hehehe!

    #343841

    Eyrie
    Participant

    Great stuff – thanks for sharing

    #343848

    andy rushworth
    Participant

    The fish in pic 15 looks like a Cobitis

    #343858

    Matt
    Keymaster

    We did discuss that possibility Andy hence the question mark. /rolleyes.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:rolleyes:” border=”0″ alt=”rolleyes.gif” /> The old ones are easy to avoid as they rattle a lot but the new ones are bloody silent!

    This is the same river we sampled earlier but within the city. You can see how much it’s been modified as the underground line now runs alongside it and flow is heavily reduced:

    Apparently Vienna is one of the most beautiful cites in Europe but in 4½ days I didn’t see much of it, so here’s a token photo of a typical building:

    First on the agenda for the second day was a brief trip to my friend Mike’s place of work, the Haus des Meeres aquarium, where he curates freshwater fishes, primates, reptiles and amphibians. The building is quite interesting since it was built as a bomb shelter during World War II so is an odd shape for a public aquarium being spread out over 9 floors:

    Can’t for the life of me remember what these are but Mike told me this is one of the only captive groups in the world. One of the things that struck me about both zoo and aquarium was the amount of conservation work going on:

    The roof of the building offers some pretty impressive views over the city:

    ID help required, but I really liked these lizards and chameleons, and what was additionally cool were the tetras and hatchetfish swimming about in the base of the displays:

    Morelia viridis?

    Very nice Anableps anableps display with loads of Poecilia velifera inside! Apologies for overall lack of fish photos – I did take quite a few but my camera performs terribly in anything less than very bright light so the results were mostly awful:

    The two rain forest displays are excellent and contain free-range monkeys and birds:

    Mike’s real passion though is goodeids (he’s chairman of the international Goodeid Working Group – website still in development) and there exist extensive breeding facilities behind the scenes. Again, sorry for pic quality, or rather lack of it

    There’s also a display containing Xenotoca eiseni with accompanying information about the GWG in the public part of the aquarium:

    Attached files

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