LOGIN

RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube
GLOSSARY       

SEARCHGLOSSARY

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

PROFILESEARCH

Botia Spp.

This topic contains 46 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Matt 9 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 47 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #316508

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Mine…kubotai/striata/hostrionica… do it daily at feeding time (now!), especially if I’m a little late! Other times at random, for different reasons it seems. When happy or after a spat, or just bored? I have one grumpy kubota (I bought him from a tank full of y. morleti) that gets very annoyed with the dancers, breaks up the party and runs them off!

    #316517

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Ok thanks again for the assistance all. First profile is now finished but if you spot any mistakes or something I’ve missed please let me know.

    Botia kubotai

    #316559

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Ok couple more questions. Is B. striata the only species with red barbels and are they always red or is it some kind of breeding colouration? Is it the only Botia to show red barbels?

    #316564

    Mark Duffill
    Participant

    I have seen a little red in the barbels of a couple of my rostrata but nothing to the degree of striata.

    I am not sure as to the significance of the red barbels in striata, I have seen some heavily gravid females with very red barbels and the same in big males, last year I got a group of 10 that had no red in their barbels at all until I got them home and the were all gasping in their bags and you would think that they had all been smacked in the nose they were all so red. It could be a spawning thing or even a stress thing I wouldn’t like to say 100%.

    #316580

    Bully
    Participant

    All my B. striata appear to have the red barbels in varying shades. I don’t have any other Botia species to compare to. I have two pics though, taken tonight – prompted by this query

    Attached files

    #316596

    Matt
    Keymaster

    But the redness is always there?

    #316607

    Bully
    Participant

    As far as I can tell yes, in mine at least. There’s a recent upload on loaches that shows a B. striata without a hint of red in the barbels.

    http://forums.loaches.com/viewtopic.php?t=19945

    #316608

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Those look very young, sign of maturity maybe?

    #316610

    Bully
    Participant

    I’m not sure what the answer is, if I’m honest. In the book Loaches Natural History and Aquarium Care there is what appears to be a juvenile B. striata on pg 7 that has redness in the barbels, so ? In the same book, on pg 121 of the species profile, it states “B. striata individuals in good health often have a redness around the nose, extending into the base of the barbels.” I have no idea what the references for this statement were, maybe it is all anecdotal? Certainly, the loach in the link above doesn’t seem in poor health and it is not displaying the colour. Maybe it’s diet-related?

    Do you have the original description?

    #316612

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Yeah but it’s not a lot of help. Want me to rip it for you?

    #316613

    Bully
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ Feb 7 2010, 11:56 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Yeah but it’s not a lot of help. Want me to rip it for you?

    If you have the time to do it, I would love a copy

    #316615

    Mark Duffill
    Participant

    QUOTE (Bully @ Feb 7 2010, 11:40 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    on pg 121 of the species profile, it states “B. striata individuals in good health often have a redness around the nose, extending into the base of the barbels.” I have no idea what the references for this statement were, maybe it is all anecdotal?

    Personal opinion more than based on any fact or relevant information.

    I have lost striata in the past that were known to be carrying something but I wasnt told this until they had died and taken other stock with them (a proper freindly thing to do /biggrin.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:D” border=”0″ alt=”biggrin.gif” /> ) and the intensity of the colouration can vary as can the colour and pattern on the body

    #316616

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Mark your explanation seems the most plausible – I’ve listed it as being a ‘typical’ feature of the species for now. What do you think?

    Also, is the generally-accepted maximum size for B. udomritthiruji accurate?

    #316617

    Mark Duffill
    Participant

    I think without knowing any more Matt that is probably the best thing to say.

    Yeah I would say antwhere around 5″ to 6″ is about right for B. udomritthiruji, 5″ is a good specimen 6″ would be an exceptional size for a tank grown fish but I would think wild specimens could attain this fairly easy.

    #316618

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Cheers Mark, and also thanks once again to yourself, Mick and others for all the great pics I’ve been adding to these Botia profiles. We really couldn’t do this stuff without everyone’s contributions so are eternally grateful even if we don’t remind you constantly.

    Author
    Posts
Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 47 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.