LOGIN

RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube
GLOSSARY       

SEARCHGLOSSARY

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

PROFILESEARCH

Brackish Water Question

Home Forums My Aquarium Brackish Water Question

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Ferrika 4 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #302628

    ckraft
    Participant

    Maybe off topic, more about water than fish.

     

    What is important about brackish water?  Things I can think of are conductivity, osmotic tension, ion content and ratios.

     

    My tap water is hard, 55 dGH, 12 dKH, about 1000 ppm tds.  Mostly  calcium sulfate, according to the published water quality report, some magnesium and sodium, too much chloride to meet US Federal regulations for discharge.

    #350291

    Matt
    Keymaster

    I’ve just shifted this into the ‘aquarium’ section since it’s not really about fish as you said.

    As far as I know salinity would be the defining quality of brackish water, i.e., it’s more salty than freshwater, less so than the ocean.

    #350297

    BillT
    Participant

    Usually brackish water refers to water resulting from the mixing of the local freshwater and seawater.

    The salinity can vary due to the variability of the mixing.

    The ions and their ratios will probably be dominated by those of seawater.

    #350309

    ckraft
    Participant

    I should have been clear about why I was asking.

     

    My tap water is hard, dGH55, dKH12

    tds about 1000 ppm

    sg 1.004

    conductivity about 2000 microseimens

     

    These readings overlap some of the numbers I’ve seen posted min various places on the Internet.  There is a small ammount of sodium and chloride ions in the water, most ofg the dissolved solids are calcium, carbonate, and sulfate ions.

     

    I’m wondering about the effect of the water, is it the same as the effect that brackish water would have on the plants and fish.

    #350314

    coelacanth
    Participant

    Which specific effects are you referring to? There are some fish and plants that I wouldn expect to do particularly badly using that water (never heard of tap water to high in dissolved minerals before), there are other fish that should thrive in it as long as it doesn’t contain other potentially toxic compounds (some killies and livebearers, some cichlids, various others). Some plants will probably do very well, I’d imagine Ceratophyllum will dbe just fine but you might need to experiment with others to see what does OK. If in doubt Java fern and Anubias are indestructible. Is it borehole water?

     

    #350349

    ckraft
    Participant

    I had to think about this for a while.  There are several questions.

     

    In keeping livebearers it is common to be told to add salt.  Nobody says if there is something specific about sodium chloride, or if the goal is just to raise TDS, which could be an effect on osmolality or conductivity. 

     

    Some fish are said to do better in brackish water. (scats, monos)  Again, is there something special about sodium chloride.

     

    Some snails (nerites) and some shrimp are said to breed only in brackish water.  In the case of nerite snails I read that the water SG should be above 1.003.  Mine is above that already.

     

    #350350

    Ferrika
    Participant

    It’s true: when the freshwater identifies a very high total hardness, it may be sufficient for specific brackish water animals already, without that will still be add salt.
    I have a hardness of 15 ° dH. With me living e.g. Omobranchus Zebra, Tetraodon biocellatus and Palaemontes variabilis without the addition of salt in the water. Here the shrimp are very sensitive. This molt in this water without any problems.

    The determining factor in brackish water is the osmotic pressure and certain mineral deposits (important for invertebrates). But this can be achieved through very hard fresh water also.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.