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Breeding paracheirodon simulans

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Breeding paracheirodon simulans

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Byron Hosking 2 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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  • #303608

    george
    Participant

    I’ve just gotten myself a group of 14 paracheirodon simulans. Has anyone got any advice on how to breed them? The fry flee light, so should I keep them in complete darkness or have dim lights and hiding places?

    #354428

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    I’ve been waiting for advice from any who have spawned this species, but in the meantime I would suggest you have a look at the information on reproduction in the profile of the closely-related Paracheirodon axelrodi in the profile , here:

    http://www.seriouslyfish.com/species/paracheirodon-axelrodi/

    I have maintained this species, in fact I recently acquired a group of sixteen as it has been years since I last saw them locally, but never attempted to spawn them, and I don’t think they have on their own.

    Byron.

    #354430

    george
    Participant

    I’m going to try to breed them in a few week’s time once they get settled in.

    I have a spare 20 liter task, so I’ll probably try to breed four males and four females. I don’t have mesh so i’ll probably try java moss and leaves instead and see how that works out. If it doesn’t work, I’ll gladly go shopping for aquarium supplies!

    #354432

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    I would suggest that very dim light, even to the extent of no overhead lighting and a cover of floating plants, along with very soft water are probably paramount.  Peat and/or dried leaves such as oak will probably help, as this species is only found in blackwaters.  Larvae are said to be killed by ultraviolet light, and many comment on the light phobia of all three Paracheirodon species, hence the need for darkness that continues during early development of the fry.  Of course, several water changes with slightly cooler water often trigger spawning in characins.

    Byron.

    #354444

    george
    Participant

    Abort! Abort! One of them is showing signs of ich! 

    Cory’s are going into a breeding tank. I’m going to raise the temperature in the main tank to 30 degrees , do a 50% water change and increase aeration.

    Anything else I could do to save them?

    I have no free tanks to isolate the only sick fish except I i don’t move the cory’s, but that would eliminate the option of raising the temperature and I guess it would put al the fish at risk in the “infected” water…

    #354445

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    @george said:
    Abort! Abort! One of them is showing signs of ich! 
    Cory’s are going into a breeding tank. I’m going to raise the temperature in the main tank to 30 degrees , do a 50% water change and increase aeration.
    Anything else I could do to save them?
    I have no free tanks to isolate the only sick fish except I i don’t move the cory’s, but that would eliminate the option of raising the temperature and I guess it would put al the fish at risk in the “infected” water…

    It is not worth moving any fish out at this stage.  If ich has attacked one fish, then it is in the tank.  Ich first attacks the gills where we don’t see it as spots but flashing is often noticeable, so any of the fish in this tank might already be carrying it.  Fish can often fight it off, but stress weakens them which is why it is so common on new arrivals.

    I would raise the temperature to 30C/86F, increase aeration. Some advocate salt, but corys do not accept this at all well, and neither will your P. simulans.  I have used CopperSafe with good results, be careful not to overdose.  I have not had issues with my corys at these elevated temperatures; my tanks in a heat wave in summer used to get close to 90F and I never lost fish.

    Byron. 

    #354446

    george
    Participant

    All I can see is one white spot on one fish, on his back towards his right flank, next to the adipose fin. I have however seen some signs of flashing, but not to any major extent yet.

    How long should the temperature be raised the temperature for?

    #354449

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    @george said:
    All I can see is one white spot on one fish, on his back towards his right flank, next to the adipose fin. I have however seen some signs of flashing, but not to any major extent yet.
    How long should the temperature be raised the temperature for?

    A week to 10 days is minimum to ensure the ich life cycle has completed.  The parasite can only be killed in the free-swimming stage, not when one the fish or lying elsewhere.  The increased heat speeds up the cycle.  Some will advocate that increasing the temperature higher will even kill the ich; I don’t know, this point is debated.

    Before dumping in medications, I would want to be certain this is a significant infestation.  One spot on one fish is not that.  I usually see some flashing on newly acquired fish (in my “quarantine” tank where I leave them for 4-6 weeks depending upon the species and my observations).  As I said previously, healthy fish can deal with this if they are not under stress, and medications should only be a last resort when clearly necessary.

    Byron.

    #354452

    george
    Participant

    Would a preventative “temperature raising” be a good idea?

    #354453

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    @george said:
    Would a preventative “temperature raising” be a good idea?

    I myself would not raise the temp, unless I was fairly certain ich was present and increasing.  One spot on one fish (that may or may not be ich) I would just observe and see.  Raising the temp would not harm the P. simulans, but the cories will not appreciate it and that means added stress which is only going to weaken them which may cause them to be more susceptible…so, best left as is for now.

    Byron.

    #354581

    george
    Participant

    The white spot was just a white spot. 

    The simulans have started behaving in a strange way though. They seem to be afraid of my presence, and I must sit completely still in order to watch them. They are in perfect health, though, showing bright colours, feeding well and sparring frequently. 

    I was away for a while recently, but that doesn’t seem to have made it worst, as the behaviour had started prior to my departure, and they are acting less skittish now that I have come back. They were fed adequately, and the water quality was maintained.

    Any idea what might be affecting them?

    #354583

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    @george said:
    The white spot was just a white spot. 
    The simulans have started behaving in a strange way though. They seem to be afraid of my presence, and I must sit completely still in order to watch them. They are in perfect health, though, showing bright colours, feeding well and sparring frequently. 
    I was away for a while recently, but that doesn’t seem to have made it worst, as the behaviour had started prior to my departure, and they are acting less skittish now that I have come back. They were fed adequately, and the water quality was maintained.
    Any idea what might be affecting them?

    You have probably identified it yourself.  I see this from all my fish; it is one disadvantage of a dedicated fish room.  For the majority of the day no one enters the fish room, so when I do, they all flee for cover.  Once I am sitting quietly for a few minutes, they are back to normal.  When I lived in the condo and had my tanks basically in or adjoining the main living space, I was moving around quite a bit, and this didn’t occur.

    Glad the spot didn’t materialize into ich.  It takes a bit of discipline, to not over-react every time we spot this or that, but in the majority of cases it is well worth it.

    Byron. 

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