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Cuba 2012

Home Forums Field Trips & Conservation Cuba 2012

This topic contains 3 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Matt 5 years, 4 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 46 through 54 (of 54 total)
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  • #348473

    nuchal man
    Participant

    Prosonta Chakrabaty who was at University of Michigan (I think he got a position at a new University) is the only one I can think of that did anything recently and it was all on cichlids. I think it’s probably to pricey for the European ichthyologists and to difficult and troublesome for the American ichthyologists. It would be really neat to see some work on the cichlids but also the livebearers.

    #348496

    Matt
    Keymaster

    After the hatchery visit we stopped at a couple of points in one of the main swamp areas, but most of it was dessicated since March-April is the end of the dry season in Cuba.

    At the second location we did find a tiny pool which turned out to be full of fishes. Species here are Gambusia puncticulataGirardinus metallicus, and Rivulus cylindraecus (females and a male). Sorry about the pic quality – the water was quite stained and it was so hot we couldn’t leave the fish in the photo tank for very long.

     

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    #348497

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Next stop was a breeding farm for the highly endangered Cuban crocodile, Crocodylus rhombifer. First photo shows the skull of a Clarias catfish which along with tilapia are the two most problematic introduced species throughout much of Cuba, and the burrow belongs to a species of large, terrestrial crab.

    Difficult to see in the photo but the head of the lizard is bluish so maybe Anolis allisoni? Turtle is the Cuban slider, Trachemys decussata. The last pic is a fully-grown, adult female crocodile used for broodstock.

     

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    #348500

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Few random shots. Pair of purple gallinule, Porphyrio martinica; West Indian woodpecker, Melanerpes superciliaris; subspecies of common moorhen resident in Cuba, Gallinula chloropus cerceris; avocado (?); tilapia.

     

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    #348501

    Matt
    Keymaster

    After lunch we drove to the edge of the Bahia de Cochinos (Bay of Pigs) and spent half an hour or so messing about near the top of its eastern shore. The crab here is dead but is the largely terrestrial Gecarcinus ruricola, the same species responsible for the burrow shown earlier. This is what happens when they migrate to the sea to breed.

    Last stop of the day was a limestone sinkhole a few hundred metres from the sea and connected to it directly via a series of underground caves. The water column consists of a pure freshwater layer on top with seawater beneath. Got a colourful form of Gambusia puncticulata here, plus a gobiid (species?).

    Across the road was a small, mangrove-lined ditch where we caught what I guess is a young Dormitator cubanus?

     

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    #348508

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Great show Matt! I’m dying for some of that clear blue water! Avocado looks like a guava?

    #348511

    oaken
    Participant

    Ah there’s my Rivulus 😀 Those are really nice. Those Gambusia puncticulata are really nice as well. That pool of water looks really small though, do you remember how big it was?

    #348516

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Cheers guys, almost finished now.:smile:

    Jim, avocado could be a guava, genuinely no idea?

    Pool was pretty small Gustav, maybe 2 metres by 1 metre. Very dry in the part of the swamp we saw.

    The rainy season was on its way though as evidenced by the clouds in the last pic. We had tropical storms in the late afternoon most days we were there.

    #348585

    Matt
    Keymaster

    This is the last species we found during the trip, near the hotel in Varadero: Gambusia rhizophorae.

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