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Diapteron cyanostictum

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Diapteron cyanostictum

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Senor Bastardo 6 years, 12 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)
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  • #301421

    Senor Bastardo
    Participant

    As I wrote in a previous post I have aquired three killies over the last month, all quite unusual.

    The second one is Diapteron cyanostictum “PEG98/8”.

    This little beautiful killi is from Gabon and reaches about 3-4 cm in total length. The fish in itself is quite bland but if you shine a torchlight at the the male you will see som quite marvelous colours. Once again I have to excuse myself for the poor quality of the pictures. The male (wich is the one that sports the fantastic colours) is extremely shy.

    He really is shy!

    In this shot you get an idea of the colours they can show.

    Attached files

    #343454

    oaken
    Participant

    Nice. Always been interested in trying out Diapteron as well. But a bit worried I wouldn’t be able to keep the temperature low enough. During the summer anyway.

    #343460

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Nice – what kind of temperature should they be kept at then chaps?

    #343472

    Senor Bastardo
    Participant

    They´re supposed to be kept really cool. Ideally 18-22 C, wich my apartment exceeds by several degrees. But I keep on top of water changes and keep an oxydator in the tank so they should be fine.

    A friend of mine has bred this very strain in normal indoor temperature and managed to get quite a lot of fry. During the worst (depending on what you prioritize) weeks of summer the fry that hatched had quite a lot of health problems. During the rest of the year the fry turned out fine.

    #343473

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Interesting – is the natural habitat high altitude or something?

    #343475

    oaken
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ May 21 2011, 07:52 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Interesting – is the natural habitat high altitude or something?

    I think its more like cool, shaded forest streams – think Barbus hulstaerti.

    #343476

    oaken
    Participant

    QUOTE (oaken @ May 21 2011, 08:42 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    I think its more like cool, shaded forest streams – think Barbus hulstaerti.

    The temperature thing goes for a lot of west african killies btw, Matt. Mainly for Aphyosemion sp. though.

    #343480

    Senor Bastardo
    Participant

    Your quite right oaken. Many african killies are found in shallow shaded forest streams, so while the country might be hot their habitat is kept cool by the forest.

    In the case of Africa the lumber industry and deforestation means that a lot of killies are losing their habitats. Thats why Gabon is quite a good place for finding killies their economy isn´t based around timber but rather oil wich (lucky for the fish) is based around the coastal areas and lumber is a minor industry.

    #343562

    Folköl
    Participant

    Hi,

    I´m following this forum quite a while. Now I thought it´s time to sing up and write something.
    I´m also keeping D. cyanostictum and kept also D. georgiae for a short time.

    For my feeling they can handle higher temperatures for a short while but I made the experience
    that temperatures over 20°C have a bad impact on the sex ratio.
    I had mainly males coming up so I started to collect the eggs only in the wintertime and raise the fry and it became better. The breader where I got them from keeps them in a storage outside the house with air conditioning and he had more females than males.

    Here an old picture. You can see a bad habit they like to attack the fins.

    Attached files

    #343569

    oaken
    Participant

    Really nice! If I manage to keep my aquariums cool during the summer I might just buy a pair or two of some species on Aquabid. Quite tempted to do so anyway

    #343572

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Agreed – lovely! Confused though. All the comments here regarding low temperature relate to egg and fry development. How do the adults do at higher temps?

    Welcome Folköl, by the way.

    #343590

    Senor Bastardo
    Participant

    The fish can cope with higher temperatueres without much issues. As Folköl stated the egg laying, sex ratio and health of the fry can be impaired by higher temperatures.

    To Folköl: as I wrote in a previous post in this thread a friend of mine has been quite succesful at breeding these in normal room temperature witout issues with the exception of the hottest weeks during the last two summers when the fry developed curves in the spine and so forth. So it can be done, it is (according to my friend and not scientifically validated) a matter of keeping the water saturated with oxygen and the water quality excellent.

    But we´ll see in the coming months if I´m succesfull or not, the fish are quite young still and haven´t started breeding just yet.

    Excellent pictures of a wonderful fish!

    #343592

    Matt
    Keymaster

    That makes sense Krister, looking at Gabon’s climate I’m guessing it breeds during the rainy season when water temperatures should be cooler. Thanks for the info.

    #343650

    oaken
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ May 25 2011, 08:51 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    That makes sense Krister, looking at Gabon’s climate I’m guessing it breeds during the rainy season when water temperatures should be cooler. Thanks for the info. http://www.aka.org/wak/Ref_Library/Aphyose…/A.coeleste.htm

    #343657

    Senor Bastardo
    Participant

    Well Gustaf that´s all true but other species can and do breed in higher temperatures. Like Aphyosemion ocellatum, ogoense and so forth. The difference between warmer and colder (among other things) is the oxygen level and I feel that you have to try just to see if it can be done as long as the fish doesn´t come to harm. The worst that can happen is that I have to rehome the fish.

    Take Apistos for example, they´re generally supposed to be kept warm and a time tested way of getting them to breed is doing a partial water change with cooler water. What you´re doing (among other things) is saturating the water with oxygen. You have been to Janne and seen his setup for his Apistos and he keep them at 22-23 degrees and they breed like crazy and are really healthy. So even if it´s ideal to try to match the parameters under wich the fish live it can be done otherwise.

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