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Freshly Hatched Leliella Sp. Larva With Fungal Affliction Of Its Egg Shell

Home Forums Invertebrates & Other Critters Freshly Hatched Leliella Sp. Larva With Fungal Affliction Of Its Egg Shell

This topic contains 9 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Andreas Werth 9 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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  • #299975

    Andreas Werth
    Participant

    Hi,
    I wanted to share a photo of one of my Leliella sp. larvae, freshly hatched yesterday.
    I found it to be interesting, that although the egg shell was obviosly afflicted by some kind of fungus, the larva hatched without a problem (as far as one can say for now).

    I hope you like it.

    #311949

    thelizzious
    Member

    QUOTE (Andreas Werth @ Jan 8 2009, 01:48 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Hi,
    I wanted to share a photo of one of my Leliella sp. larvae, freshly hatched yesterday.
    I found it to be interesting, that although the egg shell was obviosly afflicted by some kind of fungus, the larva hatched without a problem (as far as one can say for now).

    I hope you like it.


    Very impressive, Andreas. Hatch and hatchling on the same picture. Do you mind if I save this one for my collection of fry pictures? Also I hope this tiny one makes it to adulthood!

    #311951

    Bluedave
    Participant

    Wow what a picture – for us uninitiated in photography how did you capture that?

    #311958

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Amazing! Can you tell us more about the life cycle of these Andreas?

    #311963

    Haji Badaruddin
    Participant

    Andreas,

    I was waiting for somethin like this ……. Excellent pics.How small are they???What kind of tripods do you us for this kind of top view shots???

    #311966

    Andreas Werth
    Participant

    Hi all,
    thanks for your comments.

    @lizz:
    I don´t mind at all, I´m glad you like it.

    @dave:
    >how did you capture that

    I used a 60/2.8 macro lens combined with 3 Kenko extension tubes (12, 20 & 36mm) and two flashes triggered via infrared transmitter. Egg shell and larva have been photographed from above in a glass bowl.

    @matt:
    >Can you tell us more about the life cycle of these

    I do not keep them for very long now, this was the third clutch of eggs. It seems, that not only my male is a bit clumsy while taking care of the eggs, since many eggs have been whirled out of its brood tube (is that the right word?). The first egg hatched after 7 days, but today – one day after I took the above photo, all of the others are still inside. lets see how they will develop. I do hope the male gets handier with its parental care abilities, so I can stay out of his business. This was merely a try to hatch them artificially (like eggs of Corydoras species). The fact, that some of the eggs of the first two clutches (outside the tube) haven´t been harmed by shrimps and snails gave me the idea to try it. So lets see how many will make it.

    Did this answers your question about “life cycle”? I´m not sure whether I understood your question correctly.

    @Haji:
    no tripod here 😉
    I could have used my Giottos MT 9170 since it is quite adjustable (like shown here). Instead I was confident on my steady hand and took about 5 or 6 shots

    #311971

    keith565
    Participant

    fantastic photos.

    #312017

    Andreas Werth
    Participant

    Hi,
    although every single larva hatched out of its egg shell (which I wouldn´t have believed before), they have suffered fungal affliction in the end. So unfortunately, I don´t think they will make it 🙁


    Here you can see the fungus connected at the base of their pectoral fins.

    The good news is, that the parents keep on breeding…

    #312018

    thelizzious
    Member

    It’s such a shame for this tiny fella, but perhaps this might help in future, I quoted this from my thread in which Mickthefish himself wrote:

    Liz, are the snails eating the eggs first before you try to get rid of them.
    if they are the small circular snail they actually clean the eggs of debri and fungus.
    i always add some of these snails to my cory eggs.

    mick

    It may be nothing, but then again it might aswell be helpfull.

    #312019

    Andreas Werth
    Participant

    Hi Liz,
    i added about 10 trumpet snails from the beginning (I did practise that with Corydoras sterbai and it worked well), I added an extract of alder tree parts (“Erlenzäpfchen” in german) from the moment, when I became aware of the fungus problem, and I added a small sea almond leaf two days ago.
    Didn´ t help, at least so far not 🙁

    But thank you anyway for trying to help!

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