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Genetic Distinction Of Four Haplochromine Cichlid Fish Species In A Satellite Lake Of Lake Victoria, East Africa

Home Forums Ichthyology Genetic Distinction Of Four Haplochromine Cichlid Fish Species In A Satellite Lake Of Lake Victoria, East Africa

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  nuchal man 6 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #301809

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Early view article:

    Abstract

    Lake Victoria is famous for its in evolutionary terms young but species-rich assemblage of cichlid fishes. This ‘superflock’ also includes additional species from adjacent water systems. Lake Victoria is surrounded by several smaller lakes that are connected to the main water body of Lake Victoria only through swampy areas. Lake Kanyaboli is one such lake, harbouring a much poorer species diversity, mostly comprised of Lake Victoria endemics, some of which are now considered extirpated from the main lake. The focus of this study was on the modern haplochromine component of the cichlid fauna, represented by Lipochromis maxillaris, Astatotilapia nubila, Xystichromis phytophagus and Astatotilapia sp. ‘Bigeye’, as well as a number of morphologically distinct haplochromine specimens that could not be assigned to any of the recognized species. We used five microsatellite markers to distinguish these five taxa. Genetically, L. maxillaris was clearly differentiated from all other taxa, and A. sp. ‘Bigeye’ was moderately differentiated from the remaining three. Astatotilapia nubila, X. phytophagus and the unidentified specimens constituted a partially overlapping cluster. As each of the clusters had several (5–14) private alleles, extremely recent divergence is suggested. As all taxa except for A. sp. ‘Bigeye’ and the unidentified specimens also occur or at least occurred in Lake Victoria, it is likely that they evolved as part of the Lake Victoria superflock, while A. sp. ‘Bigeye’ and the unidentified specimens may have currently evolved in situ. The observation of slightly distinct albeit overlapping body shapes and the extremely close genetic relationship between three of the five taxa are fully compatible and in support of the hybrid swarm theory of adaptive radiation.

    #345866

    nuchal man
    Participant

    Really would like this paper if anyone has it!

    Thanks,

    Sam

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