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PROFILESEARCH

Glofish™

This topic contains 18 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Malti 9 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #299601

    Reva
    Participant

    Wow, that was all ghastly… /unsure.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:unsure:” border=”0″ alt=”unsure.gif” /> All I want to know is how to house them properly.

    #307582

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Do you mean Glofish Reva? /smile.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:)” border=”0″ alt=”smile.gif” />

    #307589

    ndc
    Participant

    the danios have quite an interesting story – they were originally used as a scientific test on the impacts of pollution in natural waterways – the dyed fish were used as they were much easier to see – and the checks could be made as to how long they could live etc etc. still something that should definately not be in the hobby though . i just cant see the point of buying artificial fish when theres so many fish out there. a lot is economics – re the syno issue – they are easier to hormone breed (and therefor cheaper) than catching or breeding natural stock so have unfortunately caught on -most people buying a syno wouldnt know what they are looking at , so as long as its ‘pretty’ it will do and again the fish farms have reacted to this, the biggest barrier to natural fish being in shops is cost – most people who buy fish just arent interested so will pick what they can justify economically – only a small percentage of people will pay extra for a ‘correct’ fish even if it is far superior

    #307596

    Eyrie
    Participant

    QUOTE (ndc @ Jul 25 2008, 09:59 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    the danios have quite an interesting story – they were originally used as a scientific test on the impacts of pollution in natural waterways – the dyed fish were used as they were much easier to see – and the checks could be made as to how long they could live etc etc. still something that should definately not be in the hobby though .


    Not having a go at you for repeating it, but I’ve always regarded that claim as balderdash. Testing would still be necessary and far more accurate. As far as I’m concerned it was a money making scam.

    #307598

    dunc
    Keymaster

    In fairness, I think what Neill said is probably the case.. originally. Then someone will have seen the fishes and thought “omg! they’re pretty! let’s flog them”.. and it all goes downhill from there.

    #307602

    ndc
    Participant

    its not a story, i read a piece (about 5 years ago in a scientific paper) on the use they were originally designed for – a lot of the dyed fish were injected – the danios originally had a flourescent ‘gene’ adapted into the strain ( naturally occuring ) so i dont think the danios now are produced in exactly the same way as it would have been more expensive to copy

    #307604

    Matt
    Keymaster

    QUOTE (Eyrie @ Jul 25 2008, 10:24 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Not having a go at you for repeating it, but I’ve always regarded that claim as balderdash. Testing would still be necessary and far more accurate. As far as I’m concerned it was a money making scam.

    I’m with you here Mark. Maybe the initial idea was to use these as some kind of biological pollution indicator (although why such a thing would be necessary is beyond me when we have more sophisticated methods of measuring pollutant levels already in use). The following claim froim the glofish website also made me

    #307608

    ndc
    Participant

    http://www.nus.edu.sg/corporate/research/g…/research12.htm

    heres 1 link for the university of singapore, this isnt the original article i read but it gives the basisc

    http://www.nus.edu.sg/ngs/Research%20Proje…n_Wohland_4.pdf

    this one for the reason that danio rerio is used in this field

    #307609

    ndc
    Participant

    i think i must have been typing at the same time as you matt, i put the links above on then went back and noticed youd added about the cancer etc – the 2nd link above gives the reason that why the fish are used – namely because the embrios are transparent and share a lot of indicators (in the link above hiv) to us. i also think they are used because they are so hardy and breed relatively easily

    #307611

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Yes mate I know that zebra danios have been used in research for loads of things, cellular research included. My point was that the flourescent ones specifically haven’t; they were developed for tests on water pollution as in the first article you posted. That glofish website contains all sorts of spurious claims in my opinion…

    #307614

    ndc
    Participant

    the top link is for the university of singapore where they were originally developed – glofish is a trade name owned by yorktown technologies who have an agreement with the university to be the sole suppliers around the world, (which is why they still give a percentage of the sales to the uni) – below is another extract –
    In 1999, Dr. Zhiyuan Gong and his colleagues at the National University of Singapore extracted the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from a jellyfish that naturally produced bright green bioluminescence. They inserted the gene into the zebrafish genome, causing the fish to glow brightly under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. The development of the always fluorescing fish was the first step in this process. Shortly thereafter, his team developed a line of red fluorescent zebra fish by adding a gene from a sea coral, and yellow fluorescent zebra fish, by adding a variant of the jellyfish gene. Later, a team of Taiwanese researchers at the National University of Taiwan, headed by Professor Huai-Jen Tsai (蔡懷禎), succeeded in creating a medaka (rice fish) with a fluorescent green color.

    The scientists from NUS and businessmen Alan Blake & Richard Crockett from Yorktown Technologies, a company in Austin, Texas, met and a deal was signed whereby Yorktown obtained the worldwide rights to market the GloFish. At around the same time, a separate deal was made between Taikong, the largest aquarium fish producer in Taiwan, and the Taiwanese researchers to market the green medaka in Taiwan under the name TK-1. In spring of 2003, Taiwan became the first to authorize sales of a genetically modified organism as a pet. One hundred thousand fish were reported sold in less than a month at US$18.60 a piece. It should be clarified that the fluorescent medaka are not GloFish, as they are not marketed by Yorktown Technologies, but instead by Taikong Corp under a different brand name.

    #307697

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Jesus

    #307708

    Reva
    Participant

    QUOTE (ndc @ Jul 25 2008, 01:49 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    … extracted the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from a jellyfish that naturally produced bright green bioluminescence. They inserted the gene into the zebrafish genome, causing the fish to glow brightly under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. … Shortly thereafter, his team developed a line of red fluorescent zebra fish by adding a gene from a sea coral, and yellow fluorescent zebra fish, by adding a variant of the jellyfish gene. Later… a medaka (rice fish) with a fluorescent green color….

    the reason I asked about these is that they do not look dyed and I wondered how and why this could occur. The ones in the LFS here are displayed under a black light. I always like the natural fish..even with swordtails I prefer the green wild ones, but these danios had my curiousity. they make me feel the same way that little dayglo ceramic castles do /blush.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:blush:” border=”0″ alt=”blush.gif” />

    #307755

    boyneburn
    Participant

    These fish are banned in the EU & are illegal imports as far as I know.There is a reference to this on Pete Cottle’s website.

    http://www.danios.info/fish/rerio.aspx

    #307845

    keith565
    Participant

    while i agree that these fish are ‘pretty’, they are indeed an abomination. they are genetically engineered and as such should be kept for research and nothing else.
    i read that they were supposed to be sterile so couldn’t breed, but this is obviously not the case.
    i believe someone tried to sell these on ebay a few years ago and ended up being reported to defra and i think the chap was fined and all fish destroyed as they are indeed illegal in the EU and i believe many US states.

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