LOGIN

RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube
GLOSSARY       

SEARCHGLOSSARY

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

PROFILESEARCH

Java Moss

This topic contains 11 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Jimbhoy 9 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #299660

    Jimbhoy
    Participant

    Hi people, new member, used to keep fish years ago (in my youth) decided to take it back up again now aged 55. Recently acquired new tank 48x18x12 and have so far stocked it with 15 Red Eyed Tetra’s and 2 Honey Ram’s. I’m gonna wait 4 weeks and add some some more fish. However the question I have is regarding Java Moss, is it as messy as SOME people make it out to be or is it a rumour? I’m from Wishaw (10 miles from Glasgow) if there is any budding enthusiasts nearby I’d be pleased to hear from you or anyone for that matter. Bhappy

    #308491

    Eyrie
    Participant

    Welcome!

    I had java moss before, and gave up on it as all it did was trap crud. I suspect that in a lightly stocked, frequently cleaned tank this wouldn’t be an issue. Depending on your eventual fish stocking you could get shrimp which would help keep it clean though.

    #308493

    Richy
    Participant

    It can be very messy but there’s a few ways you can try and control it. I’ve seen a few methods
    1) wrap it round some wood and tie some gravel tidy round it to hold it in place.
    2) place it under a clear plastic tub (upside down) stops shrimps etc from picking at it until it’s attached to a surface. BlueDave has done this.
    3) keep it floating but in a static area of the tank so it doesn’t blow about, it might grow well in a breeding net at the top but haven’t tried it.

    I had it in a small tank with strongish light but it was static at one end and done reasonably well until i got bored of it /blush.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:blush:” border=”0″ alt=”blush.gif” />
    Tying it down with cotton should hold it in place, don’t be shy with the cotton thread but don’t tie too tight as it may just cut through. I tried rubber band but the fell apart before it got hold and just blew all over

    #308510

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Hi Jimbhoy it’s very easy to keep and grow but like Mark says it tends to attract a lot of detritus in tanks with a lot of fish and/or water movement, especially if grown in a big clump.

    #308514

    Jimbhoy
    Participant

    Thanks folks, sounds like too much hassle, I’m eventually going to add some (15) silverfin tetra’s, 4 Pakistan loaches and 4 algae eaters. By way of a small complaint; do we need to refer to fish by their posh name, why not, to make life easier, call a fish by its common name.

    #308515

    Matt
    Keymaster

    I’m glad you asked this as it’s been bugging me for a while and I have a hunch you’re not the only one with this problem Jimbhoy (Celtic fan?). The answer to that question is….it’s up to you. Feel free to use common names in the forums but we may ask questions if we’re not sure exactly which species you’re referring to. /tongue.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:p” border=”0″ alt=”tongue.gif” />) names isn’t compulsory at all. Some members prefer to use them, although you’ll find most of us use both these and/or common/trade names depending on the thread.

    I can’t speak for others but for me the scientific names are easier to use because many species simply don’t have a common name, plus the latter can often be misleading. See the Arulius barb discussion here for an example. Another problem is that common names may be applied to more than one fish e.g. there are at least 3 species commonly imported as “rummy-nose tetra”. The use of the scientific names therefore often allows us to provide more accurate information or have more fruitful discussions. I’m also a biologist so am an unashamed geek regarding this stuff. /huh.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:huh:” border=”0″ alt=”huh.gif” />

    #308519

    Eyrie
    Participant

    Other thing is that common names are sometimes made up on the spot, so people don’t always know which species is being discussed.

    #308521

    Bluedave
    Participant

    Java moss is easy to keep mate. It doesn’t need much light.

    Tie it to some bogwood or rock with cotton – really wrap the cotton around it quite tight and it will soon grow through – you can also use some purpose made trays to grow it in – i’ve done this with riccia – thats what Richy was on about but it would work equally as well with java moss.

    I can also tell you that Crayfish love java moss.

    Pics for you –

    #308633

    Jimbhoy
    Participant

    Thanks Matt, yes I’m a Celtic supporter (C’monicus the Hoopsulatus) there you go getting used to the scientific names already It makes sense really using scientific names, but, I’m gonna have to get a book to follow what you guys are talking about. Bhappy

    #308634

    Eyrie
    Participant

    I’d recommend Baensch Vol 1 as a good species guide.

    #308639

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Yes the Baensch books are pretty good and now come in paperback so are cheaper! Jim you’ll also find many species covered in our knowledge base (click the tab at the top of this page). It is largely incomplete but all the scientific names are there and most profiles have an image of some kind now.

    #308667

    Jimbhoy
    Participant

    Thanks again, before I subscribed to the forum I had been using SF as a reference and found the site Excellent, I have checked a few other sites but SF does appear to be the best. Keep up the good work, I’ve just finished nightshift and I’m off to the land of nod folks, bhappy

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.