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Liniparhomaloptera disparis

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Liniparhomaloptera disparis

This topic contains 5 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  mikev 4 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 13 posts - 91 through 103 (of 103 total)
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    Posts
  • #347163

    mikev
    Participant

    Very welcome, Matt, hopefully this is somehow useful.

    (And please scrap what I said about the regional variations: such definitely exist, but what I have here is not a valid example.)

    My current dream btw is to somehow get hold of another Liniparhomaloptera species… just to see if they can be processed the same way… but I guess for them one has to go collecting

    #347181

    mikev
    Participant

    Matt,

    I corrected the text above…it seems I got the pseudogastros habits wrong.

    #349273

    mikev
    Participant

    definitely seasonal breeders. No eggs/no breeding behavior since spring until September, then about a month of ‘dry runs’: the fish goes through spawning motions but no eggs are deposited. eggs showed up only in the last week. Rolling back one year, the first good eggs were found at the end of November.
    so it seems that in my tank, the fertile period is November through April.

    #349281

    Matt
    Keymaster

    I’ve updated the profile to reflect all the new info above which hadn’t previously been entered. Thanks again Mike.

    #349284

    mikev
    Participant

    Looks good!

    See if you want photos on this post, they show how the fry looks like.

    It would be interesting to ask around when others had fry of ‘digger’ species, maybe we can see the picture. I think all my pseudogastromyzon fry fits into the October-April interval too, and except for some baby chenis now, all were December-April.

    #349288

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Photos added, perfect. Yolk-sac fry one is especially cool. :)

    I’m pretty sure the theory about seasonal breeding would bear out with other species. Pseudogastromyzon myersi is known to breed once per year in Hong Kong for example. Will send a paper over now.

    #349289

    mikev
    Participant

    Thanks for the paper!

    But the question is still valid: some fish drops seasonal behavior when kept in captivity, some does not. I _think_ “digger” species keep it. This may also be true for most Sewellias. S.lineolata, otoh, does not seem seasonal in captivity — do we know if it is seasonal in nature?

    #350149

    mikev
    Participant

    An update: I have F2 fry (babies of the fish born one year ago)… so I guess it is possible to maintain them long term. It is probably correct to say that the fish reaches maturity in one year (corresponding to the next breeding season).

    And I still don’t understand what happens with egg fertility: I collected about 70 eggs 10 days ago with very good %-age of fertile eggs… but the next collection, 3 days ago, resulted in mostly bad eggs, it seems only 3 hatches.

    Here is a general thought for your comments: some type of fish, mostly top, shows remarkably stable fertility ratios. For instance, I have rainbows that give nearly 100% fertile eggs, others that yield 50%, others that yield nearly 0%… ignoring the effects of better feeding/more water changes/etc these rates are consistent. But other type of fish (this time mostly bottom) may show serious discrepancies, like nearly 100% one time and nearly 0% the next one like happens with disparis. I’ve seen the same effect with cories and gobies… as just one more example, my c.pygmeus may lay 20 good eggs one time and 20 bad ones the next time.

    Is this because 2-dimensional spawning (on the ground) requires more precise positioning of the males or there is some other explanation?

    #350153

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    So you’re a Grandpa! Congrats. I want some more at some point.

    It does seem that rainbowfish eggs, for example, attached to a mop or plant, and stationary, would be an easier target for the male to fertilize. Compared to fish that scatter.

    #350154

    mikev
    Participant

    Yes, a happy Grandpa, thanks!

    If everything goes ok there should be a number of them around May…prepare the space… :P

    #350172

    Jrp
    Participant

    Congratulations!

     

    #350187

    Matt
    Keymaster

    mikev said 
    And I still don’t understand what happens with egg fertility: I collected about 70 eggs 10 days ago with very good %-age of fertile eggs… but the next collection, 3 days ago, resulted in mostly bad eggs, it seems only 3 hatches.

    Here is a general thought for your comments: some type of fish, mostly top, shows remarkably stable fertility ratios. For instance, I have rainbows that give nearly 100% fertile eggs, others that yield 50%, others that yield nearly 0%… ignoring the effects of better feeding/more water changes/etc these rates are consistent. But other type of fish (this time mostly bottom) may show serious discrepancies, like nearly 100% one time and nearly 0% the next one like happens with disparis. I’ve seen the same effect with cories and gobies… as just one more example, my c.pygmeus may lay 20 good eggs one time and 20 bad ones the next time.

    Is this because 2-dimensional spawning (on the ground) requires more precise positioning of the males or there is some other explanation?

    What’s the time difference between spawns of these species Mike, and are the same males involved each time?

    #350193

    mikev
    Participant

    One week, and no way to know about which fish spawned, it is a group.

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