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Looking for a barb

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Looking for a barb

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Joaoavo 2 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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  • #303573

    Joaoavo
    Participant

    Hello everyone

    I recently acquired a new tank (1 m, 200L – 40″, 52 gal) and I was planning on setting up something like a hillstream biotope. I have selected Sewellia lineolata (6-8) and some possible Stiphodon sp. (2-4) since they are commonly associated with this type of tank. However I am still looking for a schooling/shoaling fish that would go well with a moderate/fast current and cooler water temperatures (around 21ºC). I sincerely dislike Danio rerio and I am not very fond of other Danio/Devario species, so I was wondering if there were some barb species compatible with those conditions. P. denisonii springs to mind and would be awesome, but I believe the tank is quite short for these guys.

    Any suggestions are welcome.

    Cheers

    #354276

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    My first thought was also Sahyadria denisonii, but I agree the tank is too small.  This is also a benthic feeding fish, so that might mean a lot of fish at the bottom of the water column.

    For other barbs, consider Pethia conchonius, Pethia padamya and Puntius semifasciolatus.  The tank size is fine, the temperature is fine, and these three do occur in flowing streams, though not sure just how fast a current is being considered in your aquarium.

    Byron.

    #354277

    Joaoavo
    Participant

    @Byron

    Appreciate the reply. First of all, thank you for correcting the name of Sahyadria denisonii. I didn’t know it moved to another genus.

    As for the other suggestions, I was considering either P. padamya or P. semfasciolatus, although I’m not sure they like strong currents. P conchonius seems to come from a river with a stronger water flow, but they don’t look as good as the others to me.

    I don’t want a current as strong as the one in this video, but something between that and still water. Hopefully it is enough to provide good oxygenation for the loaches and gobbies, and not too much for the barbs.

    #354278

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    Yes, that is a strong current, though well suited to the loaches.  I’ve not kept any of the “Hillstream” loach, so can’t comment on just how much current is needed.  But I too would worry about the upper fish.  Sometimes aquarists forget that the fish are forced to manage 24 hours every day with no respite, and this takes considerable energy from fish that are not physiologically designed for this condition, which will weaken them.

    Sometimes it is possible to strike a happy medium, if the tank is large enough.  You can build “walls” out of chunks of wood and/or rock to block the current and redirect it, leaving an area of quiet.  I’ve managed something like this in my 5-foot 115g, where I have the strong flow aimed directly into one end wall for the driftwood catfish that reside in a chunk of wood under the filter return, but by the time the current has hit the wall and been dispersed down the tank it is considerably weaker.  It is interesting how many of the fish will tend to basically avoid that end, and remain in the quieter area, while some like the panda cories love to play for hours in the current.

    The genus Sahyadria was erected in 2013 (presumably after the last profile revision) by Raghaven et al. for the two “denison” species, Sahyadria denisonii and S. chalakudiensis.  Dr. Eschmeyer (CAS database) has accepted this, so I’ll get this study added to the profiles.

    Byron.

    #354283

    Joaoavo
    Participant

    I guess that the current is primarily needed to meet the oxygen requirements of the fish.

    I was planning to go with a setup as shown in the draft

    http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e284/Joaoavo/draft%20aqua_zpsupxfpaix.jpg

    The lack of “walls” can be troublesome for the barbs, so I thought that, in order to overcome this, the powerhead could be placed facing the front glass on one end. This would cause the current to be much slower in the opposite end while still providing enough movement to oxygenate the water.

    #354285

    Dana
    Participant

    Hi!

    In my opinion not only the fry, but also adult Sewellia don´t spend much of their time directly in the strong current and appreciate quieter areas too. My Sewellia tanks run with self made air operated mat filter (for efficient filtration and aeration) plus a suplementar pump, positioned about half tank height and the water flow oriented slightly downwards. The current in the tanks is moderate (upside) to strong (downside).
    I also noticed, Sewellia love to sit on high leaves, wood, or rocks and observe theier world from above.

    This is a view of my 80 x  50 x 30 cm Sewellia sp spotted tank, showing the air operated mat filter (it´s the lowest tank in a 3 sides freestanding 3 tanks rack):

    P1120182.JPG

     u1-141029_04.JPG

     
    Here you can see one side of the above tank and the position of the suplementar pump (450l/h), aproximatively under the air filter outlet:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvERj1xkTd4

    I care for the older S. sp. spotted since July 2011, without losses or problems. Until 2 years ago the S. spotted lived in a “classic” hillstream tank (100 x 40 x 40 cm, intake on one side, outflow on the other side) and I couldn´t see any difference in their behavior.


    I also have a small 60 l tank for Sewellia lineolata
    which is following the same filtration and flow principles, just different design:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4HAagMBxjeQ

    #354287

    Joaoavo
    Participant

    @dana

    Thank you so much for the input. The tanks seem much quieter than what I expected. I believe that I can add a simple powerhead to increase surface agitation and all of the fish will be fine.

    I bet yours are quite happy in those setups. Congratulations

    Cheers

    #354288

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    There we are, something like that should pose no problems re the current.

    Very nice aquascapes Dana, indeed.  Lovely and lively–and I’d bet very happy–fish, too.  Thanks for the videos.

    Byron.

    #354312

    knutschi
    Participant

    How about Tanichthys albonubes? They should be fine with some current and also prefer lower temps.

    #354325

    Joaoavo
    Participant

    Hello,

    Tanichthys albonubes are also a posibility. If I stick with this plan for the aquarium, the decision will be between 10 odessa barbs or 20 T. albonubes as the schooling fish.

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