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Microctenopoma Species

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Microctenopoma Species

This topic contains 12 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  David Marshall 10 years ago.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #299625

    Matt
    Keymaster

    David’s new Microctenopoma damasi project is making me jealous. I’ve kept M. fasciolatum (form “B” if you follow Aqualog) and M. ansorgii in the past and loved them both. They are really interesting fish and I know that at least 2 other members here have them/have kept them so thought I’d start this thread to share experiences. I’ll chip back in tomorrow as I’m really tired but thought I might forget if I don’t write something now.
    Pic credit: http://www.ne.jp

    Attached files

    #308070

    keith565
    Participant

    great topic Matt. as you know i have m fasciolatum, have had them a while now, but no spawns yet. they are a very nice fish, a bit shy at times.
    here is a picture of the male, not a good shot i’m afraid.

    Attached files

    #308086

    Reva
    Participant

    I want some really BADLY

    #308087

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey Riva

    Am sure Matt won’t mind me answering your question.

    Up until fairly recently all the African bushfish belonged to genus Ctenopoma. Breeding methods then accounted for a ‘split’. Ctenopoma are fish which reproduce by simply scattering their eggs and milt to take a chance on reproducing their own kind. Microctenopoma construct primitive nests of bubbles to hold their eggs and fry.

    Both C. and M. are closely related to the well-known Climbing perch, genus Anabas, of Asia.

    Regards David

    #308103

    Reva
    Participant

    QUOTE (David Marshall @ Aug 4 2008, 01:31 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Hey Riva

    Am sure Matt won’t mind me answering your question.

    Up until fairly recently all the African bushfish belonged to genus Ctenopoma. Breeding methods then accounted for a ‘split’. Ctenopoma are fish which reproduce by simply scattering their eggs and milt to take a chance on reproducing their own kind. Microctenopoma construct primitive nests of bubbles to hold their eggs and fry.

    Both C. and M. are closely related to the well-known Climbing perch, genus Anabas, of Asia.

    Regards David

    Thanks David…so are they both anabantids even if Ctenopoma do not build bubblenests?

    #308124

    Matt
    Keymaster

    They are Reva, and closely related as David said.

    #308128

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey Matt

    Your system sounds fine. With ansorgii many people, because of the extremely primitive nest, never realise reproduction between a pair has taken place.

    Regards David

    #308129

    Reva
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ Aug 5 2008, 03:22 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    They are Reva, and closely related as David said. /wub.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:wub:” border=”0″ alt=”wub.gif” />

    Would the Kribs eat the Bushfish fry? everyone else in there has a sucker mouth except the tiger barbs….

    #308133

    Richy
    Participant

    I don’t know anything about the fish in the main topic but YES I’d imagine the Kribs will eat the fry

    #308149

    Matt
    Keymaster

    I would say so Reva, and the barbs would probably get in on the feast too. From what I’ve read acutirostre produce loads of eggs so be sure to have some grow-out tanks ready!

    David that is pretty much how it happened for me. Some of the Java fern was growing emerse and they built the nest behind this so I couldn’t see it. Once I spotted the first fry I started observing them more closely although it was still difficult to see much of the spawning behaviour as the tank was so dark.

    #308175

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey Matt

    Yes ansorgii live a secretive life. Of the labyrinth grouping I think the spawning behaviour of Channa bleheri is perhaps the most strange. Adults enjoy a well lit aquarium more than any other labyrinth fish yet spawning reports indicate that pairs reproduce, in complete privacy, in caves.

    Regards David

    #308435

    Matt
    Keymaster

    There are a few Channa species that are known to spawn in caves. I had a fantastic pair of C. stewartii (remember them Neill?) that excavated a real network of tunnels under the driftwood in their tank. David how do you intend to spawn the damasi? Do they need similar conditions to ansorgii?

    #308439

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey Matt

    Yes the spawning conditions are similar to ansorgii. The pair are getting along fine and when the male gets a little rough the female retreats to her favourite cave. Will post any spawning activity as and if it happens.

    Regards David

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