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Myxocyprinus Asiaticus

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Myxocyprinus Asiaticus

This topic contains 17 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  David Marshall 8 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #300221

    Matt
    Keymaster

    …and this one chaps? I’ve seen the youngsters on sale a few times, especially here in Spain oddly enough, but never kept it. Still illegal in the UK right? I wonder how popular it would be if more people realised that as an adult it looks a lot like a shoe?

    Attached files

    #314005

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey Matt

    Yes still illegal here.

    A fish of China which almost became extinct, in the wild, as it could not compete with introduced Carp. Commercially farmed these days. Some excellent photographs of adults can be found on the China visit articles by Howard Norfolk on Aquarticles website.

    When these fish were in the U.K. an aquatic retailer told me that the big problems are in getting these fish to feed and in stopping them from jumping from ponds/aquaria. I believe that, as with Sturgeon/Sterlets, you have to take care not to let the water temperature become to high and remember reading several reports of fishkeepers who lost young M.a. that became entangled in blanketweed. M.a. also have the potential to grow into what Koi keepers call ‘baby whale proportions’.

    Regards David

    #314007

    Mark Duffill
    Participant

    Even though illegal they still come through in astonishing numbers, a friend of mine ordered some when she was importing and they were checked by Defra in a room with a poster of them on the wall listing them as illegal and they came in under their correct name and were still allowed through /laugh.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:lol:” border=”0″ alt=”laugh.gif” />

    I do kn ow of people that have kept them in both heated aquarium and unheated ponds and they have done well, I have yet to hear of a specimen growing in excess of 18″ in this country in fact I haven’t heard of one over 12″ in a long time.

    #314008

    andy rushworth
    Participant

    Hi Mark, yeah to say they grow so big in the wild ,you never see a pic of a large individual , or even hear of one for that matter /wacko.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:wacko:” border=”0″ alt=”wacko.gif” />
    The pic I saw of an adult freshly captured from a river in China ,looked pretty awsome ! unless it was a different fish ? like a pinkish base colour with a reddish band through middle ?

    #314009

    Mark Duffill
    Participant

    QUOTE (andy rushworth @ Jun 1 2009, 05:51 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    The pic I saw of an adult freshly captured from a river in China ,looked pretty awsome ! unless it was a different fish ? like a pinkish base colour with a reddish band through middle ?

    Yeah that’s one of the pics I have seen, there are pics from America I think where some have been introduced to waterways and after that they loose the hi-back and become more long and elongated. I think they may well be very long lived fish, maybe in the realms of koi etc so I think they will take a long time to mature to the long elongated stage.

    #314010

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey Andy & Mark

    Remember that, like some fellow cyprinids we know as Lemon-fin barbs, the body of an adult asiaticus is very deep.

    Are you lads confusing asiaticus with their closest relatives, commonly known as the Carpsuckers, of the genus Carpiodes? These fish are native to North America and can reach a body size of 26″.

    Regards to you both
    David

    #314012

    Mark Duffill
    Participant

    There are images of a couple of adults here

    #314013

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey MD

    Interesting pages and had not previously seen these images/paintings.

    Have you looked at the photographs taken by Howard on his visit to Beijing Aquarium? The adults pictured look like those on the Chinese pages, and have lost all of their ‘baby colours’ etc., but are more ‘natural’ in colour.

    Do you think:

    1. As we know Matt’s photo. shows a juvenile.
    2. Howard’s photographs show the adult stage.
    3. The top left photo. on the page of Chinese origin shows a ‘pensioner’ in terms of age.

    Three stages of great change?

    Certainly very interesting.

    Regards David

    #314015

    Matt
    Keymaster

    QUOTE (andy rushworth @ Jun 1 2009, 04:51 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    I must admit I do like the look of these fish , not sure I agree with its nickname /blink.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:blink:” border=”0″ alt=”blink.gif” /> I think it’s just the males that develop the red lateral stripe. Really quite stunning:

    Attached files

    #314016

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey Matt

    This is turning into a very interesting thread.

    Does the source of the pictures mention fish size?

    Regards David

    #314017

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Hi David 135cm though not sure if this is SL or not.

    #314020

    Mark Duffill
    Participant

    QUOTE (David Marshall @ Jun 2 2009, 12:24 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Hey MD

    Interesting pages and had not previously seen these images/paintings.

    Have you looked at the photographs taken by Howard on his visit to Beijing Aquarium? The adults pictured look like those on the Chinese pages, and have lost all of their ‘baby colours’ etc., but are more ‘natural’ in colour.

    Do you think:

    1. As we know Matt’s photo. shows a juvenile.
    2. Howard’s photographs show the adult stage.
    3. The top left photo. on the page of Chinese origin shows a ‘pensioner’ in terms of age.

    Three stages of great change?

    Certainly very interesting.

    Regards David

    Yeah I think these fish go through probably one of the more drastic body/colour changes of any freshwater fish, a friend of mine did translate some Chinese text for me once and from what he could understand some of the text talked of these fish reaching 10 years old in the juvenile form and reaching anywhere from 12 to 18 years before becoming sexually mature which puts them in line with sturgeon some of which can be 22 years old before reaching sexual maturity.

    I think it is the males that carry the iridescent red colouration but all of these colours do fade after sexual maturity and the red band in males becomes a dark brown band.

    I suppose the fact that these fish are so long lived could explain why we have never seen such a big specimen in this country as I don’t think anyone has kept them long enough, I also wonder if as they grow they are similar to sturgeon in that some require brackish conditions or they require lower temperatures ?

    #314021

    scissorfight
    Participant

    I love these! I have tried keeping them a few times, but they all ended up with some kind of fungal thing. I think I did 3 things wrong: temperature not low enough, food too meaty and too much competition from oter fish.

    #314024

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey

    Mark – To take so long to mature, which is known to happen with a number of both Asian and South American catfish species, could explain why introduced Carp decimated M.a. numbers in the wild. Yes explains why we have not seen ‘baby whales’ here.

    scissorfight- Thank you for telling us about your experiences with these fish. The retailer in the U.K., see my first post on this thread, had similar problems.

    Regards David

    #314038

    andy rushworth
    Participant

    Thanks to Mark and Matt for posting pics of mature fish [pinkish with a reddish lateral band] , David are you trying to send me round the twist /rolleyes.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:rolleyes:” border=”0″ alt=”rolleyes.gif” /> /laugh.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:lol:” border=”0″ alt=”laugh.gif” />

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