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New Tank

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  MatsP 7 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #300833

    Fishwife
    Participant

    I’ve just bought a new tank /rolleyes.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:rolleyes:” border=”0″ alt=”rolleyes.gif” /> Such as Kissing, Moonlight and Pearl Gouramies, Swordfish and Scissortail Rasbora.

    I’ve always wanted Pearl, or even Indian Gouramies but never thought my tanks big enough, would these 2 species fit? Or can anyone please suggest any fish around the 2 to 3 inch range. Would a pair of Swordtails fit in? I saw some nice Black Ruby Barbs the other day, but not sure of their suitability.

    At the moment I have 7 Cardinals and 7 Microrasbora kubotai which are quite small, later on (when my Betta dies) I intend to put these gorgeous little chaps in my 25 litre tank where George is now, but for the time being both shoals will have to go in the new tank.

    I don’t want to buy anything that would be cramped in the tank, I don’t want Corries, as mine never seem to live more than a year, I will research all fish before I buy but could do with some ideas. Thanks

    #318725

    MatsP
    Participant

    If you go by the rule for tank-size of 4L x 2L x 2L, where L is the length of the fish, we can derive the max size of the fish: whatever is smallest of half the width & height and a quarter of the length.

    So lets put those numbers in, since 39 is smaller than 52, we use 39:
    39/2 = 18
    62/4 = 15.5

    So the max size, that would be “ok” in that tank [assuming they have a relatively sedate temperament], would be just 15.5cm or 6.1″.

    Obviously, keeping fish that is a bit smaller than that would definitely be preferred. But certainly 2-3″ fish is perfectly fine.

    The other part to consider is the total size of all the fish – a very basic rule is the 1inch / gallon or 1cm per 2 liter (that’s not EXACTLY the same thing, as the former makes 2.5cm per 3.8 or 4.5 liter, and the latter says a 2.5cm fish needs 5 liter). There are other rules for calculating the amount of fish that can be held in a tank, and it’s really quite complicated if you REALLY want to do it RIGHT. Other factors include the surface area of the tank [which gives the amount of oxygen the water can take up] and filter capacity [which gives the amount of fish-waste the system can cope with] being taken into account.

    Of course, we should also take into account the overall size of the fish – realistically, a 50cm spiny eel that is quite narrow will obviously take up less tank-size needed than a 50 cm fat koi!

    Your tank is taller than the average 90 liter tank [which would be about 70-80cm length and 30-40cm wide/high], which reduces the surface area of the tank quite a bit.

    Given all this, I’d say you’d be looking at a little less than the 45 cm (18″) – say aim for about 35-40cm total fish length (14-16″).

    So, swords are fine. The barbs may be a bit of a push, if we consider that they should be kept in a group of about 5-6, and at 6cm, that’s just about all of your “fish length budget” – and they aren’t a really skinny fish either.


    Mats

    #318726

    Fishwife
    Participant

    Thanks for that, most interesting. I’ll have to do some re-calculating. According to that, my 50 litre was overstocked, but I had a Fluval U2 filter so it was really over-filtered and the fish certainly seem healthy enough

    #318727

    MatsP
    Participant

    Having good filtration, fish that aren’t very sensitive to water quality, and large water-changes will all help in allowing your tank to have slightly higher stocking.

    And the equations I have given are simplifications, so you should take it with a pinch of salt. The fish health is what matters. However, one of the consequences of having a higher stocking level than ideal, IF something goes wrong, it will go more wrong or go wrong quicker than it would if you have a lesser stocking level.


    Mats

    #318744

    Senor Bastardo
    Participant

    The size of the fish is only one parameter you shuold consider. I keep my Boraras maculatus in a bigger tank than many of my killis even though they are much bigger, since this species, in contrast to the killies, is an active swimmer.

    Since your tank is more tall than wide, a bigger fish might be a better choice than a smaller one if it´s not a very active swimmer.

    But as MatsP wrote it pays off to have a sensible stocking level and a fish that is twice the length is more than twice as big when looking at body mass.

    #318747

    MatsP
    Participant

    Absolutely agree. Active fish needs more space, absolutely.

    Territorial species also need more space.

    Docile species can be held in a smaller tank, as long as water quality is still maintained.


    Mats

    #318770

    Nomad
    Participant

    A note about your corys.

    If you find your corys are dying after only a short period, they are long lived fish, there are several reasons above all others.

    The first and most common is lack of bottom cleaning. The gravel becomes a rank pit of uneaten food, faeces and other rotting material and the poor corys are exposed to all sorts of nasties. Tanks containing these and other bottom dwelling fish, like loaches, need regular and thourough gravel vacuuming.

    The next most common problem is sharp gravel which leads to a dterioration of the barbels and allows infection to set in.

    They are starving. Many people think of these guys a scavenging “clean-up crew”, in reality on ly a small portion of what they require will be achieved from scavaging leftovers if the other fish are being fed the correct amoune. All bottom dwellers should be fed a complete diet and should be observed to ensure they are eating sufficiently.

    #318773

    Senor Bastardo
    Participant

    QUOTE (Nomad @ Sep 8 2010, 03:45 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    A note about your corys.

    If you find your corys are dying after only a short period, they are long lived fish, there are several reasons above all others.

    The first and most common is lack of bottom cleaning. The gravel becomes a rank pit of uneaten food, faeces and other rotting material and the poor corys are exposed to all sorts of nasties. Tanks containing these and other bottom dwelling fish, like loaches, need regular and thourough gravel vacuuming.

    The next most common problem is sharp gravel which leads to a dterioration of the barbels and allows infection to set in.

    They are starving. Many people think of these guys a scavenging “clean-up crew”, in reality on ly a small portion of what they require will be achieved from scavaging leftovers if the other fish are being fed the correct amoune. All bottom dwellers should be fed a complete diet and should be observed to ensure they are eating sufficiently.

    I totally agree Nomad! Don´t get me started on people who think they need a “clean-up crew”. The only good that´ll do is increasing the bioload. Buy the fish you WANT and keep the gravel clean YOURSELF.

    #318775

    MatsP
    Participant

    I completely missed the comment about corys that only live for a year – good points made. I would also add that it is not unusual for certain types of corys to live short lives in captivity because the temperature is higher than ideal. Many corys prefer temperatures in the 18-22’C range, which is lower than the temperature recommended for many tropical fish. This doesn’t mean ALL corys like colder water. But it’s another reason for short lives in certain corys – Panda and Paleatus (peppered) Corys are in the list of “like cooler water”. On the opposite end of the scale are Corydoras sterbai, that really prefer a temperature around 27’C, and don’t mind living at 30’C for a part of the year.

    I also strongly believe that the best substrate for corys is sand – and I’m not alone. I’ve been to two Catfish Study Group conferences, and the people I meet there that know lots more about corys than I do, all swear by having a sand substrate for corys (make sure it’s soft/rounded sand). Don’t lay a thick layer – between a quarter and half an inch (6-13mm) is definitely enough.

    And keeping them in a group is reducing their stress levels.


    Mats

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