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New Tank Set Up

Home Forums The Lounge New Tank Set Up

This topic contains 15 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Reva 10 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #299613

    Dave S
    Participant

    Hello,

    I’ve had a coldwater tank for a while now and have invested in a 125L tropical tank that’s currently happily cycling.

    Ive got a sand substrate, and have plated it pretty heavily, got caves, drift wood, etc. PH is currently neutral, but realise I might need to make it slihtly more acidic for what I propose.

    I’m wondering what to stock it with, and am getting a bit carried away, but so far am thnking of

    8 X cherry barbs (adding 1st as they’re hardy by the sounds of it)
    8 X purple emperor tetras
    1 X Pearl gourami
    8 X small cory’s

    Read what you say about keeping Asian/S.American species separate, but I think this tank would be good. I’d really like to base it around the purple emperor tetras, as they look good, but am open to suggestions and criticisms other than that!

    All help appreciated, and realise you probably get a lot of requests like these – so thanks in advance!

    #307742

    mickthefish
    Participant

    hi Dave, remind me what 125L is in gallons mate, sorry i’m a dinosaur and still work things out the old way.

    #307745

    Dave S
    Participant

    QUOTE (mickthefish @ Jul 27 2008, 09:26 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    hi Dave, remind me what 125L is in gallons mate, sorry i’m a dinosaur and still work things out the old way.
    #307746

    Matt
    Keymaster

    There’s absolutely no reason why fish from different continents can’t be mixed provided they’re all compatible Dave. I don’t think we’ve said anywhere that they shouldn’t be mixed as a rule. Your proposed combo sounds fine although I’d be tempted to go for perhaps a pair of the gouramis rather than just a single fish. /laugh.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:lol:” border=”0″ alt=”laugh.gif” />

    #307750

    Eyrie
    Participant

    It does look better though

    #307752

    Malti
    Participant

    from experience gouramis prefer being more than 1…a pair or trio is better

    #307769

    Dave S
    Participant

    Thanks Guys, I’ll take your advice and go for a pair of gouramis – I guess you mean a male and female?!

    I’ve read somewhere that they prefer calm water – does this mean I shouldn’t get an aeration set for the tank?

    I’m cycling it using Nutrafin Cycle at the moment. I figured do that for 2 weeks then add the Cherry Barbs?

    #307770

    Malti
    Participant

    if possible male and female…and i usually let about 10 days before adding fish

    #307774

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Hi Dave. First tip, get rid of that Nutrafin c**p. It doesn’t do anything useful. Secondly yes, a male and female gourami would be ideal although most shops sell them as juveniles and they’re not so eay to sex accurately at that age. The gouramis do like quite still water. What kind of filter do you have on the tank just now?

    #307776

    Dave S
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ Jul 28 2008, 01:25 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Hi Dave. First tip, get rid of that Nutrafin c**p. It doesn’t do anything useful. Secondly yes, a male and female gourami would be ideal although most shops sell them as juveniles and they’re not so eay to sex accurately at that age. The gouramis do like quite still water. What kind of filter do you have on the tank just now?
    #307777

    Matt
    Keymaster

    You should be fine with just the Fluval buddy. If you don’t have one maybe buy a spraybar kit for it which will not only help to diffuse the flow but if you place it at the water surface will supply plenty of oxygenation too. That Cycle stuff is a gimmick in my opinion yes, although just running the tank empty won’t help to cycle it either. You have a couple of choices. Buy some fish now or get hold of some pure ammonia and perform what is known as a “fishless” cycle. I’m sure some of the other members will have some further suggestions…

    #307779

    brightsyde
    Participant

    The most humane way to cycle a tank is using pure ammonia which can be picked up in most diy stores. You’ll need a test kit too to monitor the ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels so that you know when it’s cycled. If you’ve got another tank, or a friend with a tank, you can transfer mature media from that tank into your new filter, but the bacteria will need a source of ammonia to feed off of, so either add fish or ammonia too. A handful of gravel from a mature tank will aid the seeding process as well.
    Putting fish into an uncycled tank exposes them to harmful ammonia and nitrite levels, and while it may not have an immediate visible effect, both are poisonous to fish and will do some damage, whether visible or not.

    #307780

    Dave S
    Participant

    OK thanks I’ll get some household ammonia – read about it in an article somewhere on here!

    How much/how often and for how long should I use it?

    #307789

    brightsyde
    Participant

    Now you’re asking!

    I don’t know how much you know about cycling and filtration etc so I’ll try and explain it basically, although I usually end up over-complicating things……

    Right.
    Fish produce ammonia. On your filter media, bacteria grow which consume the ammonia. The by-product of this process is nitrite. A second type of bacteria then grow which consume the nitrite, and produce nitrate in the process. The level of nitrates in your tank is reduced through water changes.

    You want to add enough ammonia to bring your ammonia levels in the tank to about 3ppm (obviously determined with test kit). Then you will need to test the tank daily, maintaining the ammonia level by adding more when it drops. When the ammonia starts to drop, the first set of bacteria are colonising the filter media. You need to continue maintaining ammonia level to feed these. You will then see a rise in nitrite. When this starts to drop, the second set of bacteria are colonising the media, and you will get a raised nitrate reading (you need to test the nitrate level in tap water to compare). If you do not plan to put on fish yet, you need to keep feeding ammonia or the bacteria will die off.
    Once you have done a large water change to reduce the nitrates, fish can safely be stocked, and provided this is done sensibly, there will be no ammonia or nitrite spikes.

    Does that make sense??

    There is a formula for determining the amount of ammonia needed, although I’ve never used it personally:

    Desired tank ammonia level/ (Ammonia concentration % (from the label) x 10/tank volume in litres) = Amount of household ammonia to add in ml

    There are various graphs and tables around on the internet to explain the cycling process in pictures if you do a search.

    Hope that helps!

    p.s forgot to add, cycling can take anywhere usually between about 8 days and 3 weeks.

    #307805

    Eyrie
    Participant

    I usually recommend maintaining the ammonia at 5ppm until the ammonia reading drops to nil, and then cutting back to 3ppm. Both ammonia and nitrIte have to spike and then fall back to nil before adding any fish, although you can then fully stock the tank (based of course on the eventual adult sizes of the fish).

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