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Odd B. splendens

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Odd B. splendens

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Joaoavo 2 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
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  • #303499

    Barb Man
    Participant

    I recently bought a yellow female Betta and was wondering if someone might be able to confirm that it is in fact a female because I intend to purchase a male and don’t want them fighting. If there has been any hybridization that seems apparent identification would also be helpfulIMG_0362.JPG

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    #353929

    paul thompson
    Participant

    It is difficult to be absolutely certain of the sex of this betta looking at your pictures. Looking at picture 3 the dorsal and ventral fins are elongated and pointed which is more common in young male fish that are just starting to develop their fins. The fish in your pics look about  3 – 4 months old? Females in some strains however, do have elongated fins.

    A more reliable way of sexing the fish is to look for the white “egg spot” that is located under the ventral fins (extending from the vent of the fish). Yellow bettas will breed true but, in my experience, are not as vigorous as other colour strains. Also if you intend to add a male to your aquarium with females you need plenty of hiding places and a minimum of 3 females. Having only one female may result in the fish being badly harassed or even killed.

    Hope this helps

    Paul

    #353930

    Barb Man
    Participant

    I thought it might be a male because I actually read a bit of the profile and took notice of the way some breeders breed makes with short find to stop hobbyist breeding. ‘She’ was chasing some of the other fish I have too so I’m suspicious. Will look for the egg spot and and maybe try to take better pics when she is better settled in

    #354003

    Joaoavo
    Participant

    Not sure if this is still helpful but it looks like a male to me. I too was fooled once with B. splendens. I bought a trio that I thought were 1M+2F. They lived peacefully in the tank until I removed the dominant male to start breeding in a different tank. Then, in a matter of days, the disguised male assumed a different coloration and behavior.

    One thing you can do to test the fish, is to put a mirror in front of him. If it displays aggressive dominant behavior (flaring of opercula) it is probably a male.

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