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Parosphemenus Setup And Care

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Parosphemenus Setup And Care

This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  C.Way 7 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #300749

    C.Way
    Participant

    hi all, was wondering if any one have the experience of keeping or breeding paros, I would like to know the overall setup like minimum tank size for a pair and decoration of tank

    also I would like to know more about common illness faced by this fish, thanks

    Species that are coming soon to my place is paros nagyi in another few days time, following by paros allani and paros “blue line” around the mid of this month or end of this month

    basic information of the place I keep them: hill side of tropical country, temperature ranging from 25 C to 29 C over the whole year, could be lower till 22 C on rainy season. Water ph of tap water around 6

    appreciate for all input of information

    #318092

    harnsheng
    Participant

    QUOTE (C.Way @ Jun 11 2010, 10:12 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    hi all, was wondering if any one have the experience of keeping or breeding paros, I would like to know the overall setup like minimum tank size for a pair and decoration of tank

    also I would like to know more about common illness faced by this fish, thanks

    Species that are coming soon to my place is paros nagyi in another few days time, following by paros allani and paros “blue line” around the mid of this month or end of this month

    basic information of the place I keep them: hill side of tropical country, temperature ranging from 25 C to 29 C over the whole year, could be lower till 22 C on rainy season. Water ph of tap water around 6

    appreciate for all input of information /sad.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:(” border=”0″ alt=”sad.gif” />

    #318093

    C.Way
    Participant

    QUOTE (harnsheng @ Jun 12 2010, 12:03 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    hey,

    they can be kept in very small tank, although, my minimum would be 1ft. More water are always safer and stable. My setup, i used a overturn flowerpots, some ‘Ketapang’ leave (Indian Almond leaves) and thats about it. Rainwaters and peat moss is recommended too.. Keep the lights on the low side as they are pretty shy fish. Add some live plants which can withstand the water acidity, such as ferns, anubias..

    I havent encounter any illness yet, and only manage to breed one species before, P.rubrimontis. Pretty much easy and low maintenance.. havent manage to breed nagyi yet, as the female decided to jump out from the tank..

    #318096

    kim m
    Participant

    You can also try to contact Karsten Keibel at http://www.pandaplus.dk he has a lot of experience with several species

    #318103

    harnsheng
    Participant

    Not any at the moment.

    I’ve kept P.rubrimontis, P.nagyi, and few others.. before. Long time ago

    #318108

    oaken
    Participant

    I’m keeping a few species at the moment, got fry of P. sp. “Sungai Bertam” and P. nagyi “Cherating”. Haven’t ever had a disease in any of them, but like with every other anabantoid they are prone to getting Oodinium.

    The most important thing when breeding is to have good water free of salts, like rainwater or reverse osmosis-water. The pH value does not seem to be that important as long as its below 6. I do think that 29 degrees is probably a bit on the high side, but I’m not sure how they will react to it. A great plant to keep in their aquariums is Ceratopteris cornuta as it is one of the few plants that can actually thrive under these conditions, mosses also seems to do pretty well.

    #318116

    C.Way
    Participant

    QUOTE (oaken @ Jun 14 2010, 04:16 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    I’m keeping a few species at the moment, got fry of P. sp. “Sungai Bertam” and P. nagyi “Cherating”. Haven’t ever had a disease in any of them, but like with every other anabantoid they are prone to getting Oodinium.

    The most important thing when breeding is to have good water free of salts, like rainwater or reverse osmosis-water. The pH value does not seem to be that important as long as its below 6. I do think that 29 degrees is probably a bit on the high side, but I’m not sure how they will react to it. A great plant to keep in their aquariums is Ceratopteris cornuta as it is one of the few plants that can actually thrive under these conditions, mosses also seems to do pretty well.

    Thanks for the information, helps a lot, got my p. nagyi few hours earlier, seems to settle well by now

    how does salt affect them in breeding? I’ve been dosing a small amount of salt in all my aquarium set up as a precaution all the while, fishes that live well with paros in the wild like betta seems to have no trouble with it.

    29 or 30 degree is too high for them to breed according to some local hobbyist, but they will still survive(nearly impossible to breed at that temperature), I’m placing them indoor at the moment, air condition will do the trick of lowering the temperature, my back up plan is to shift them to my backyard where water temperature stay constant around 24 to 27 C, but with exposure to little direct sun light and rain

    For plant wise, 3 tanks is prepared for paros, one with purely java moss, one with a mix of java moss and java fern and one with lot of hard leaves litters and java fern

    Was wondering how many locality of p. nagyi is known

    #318121

    oaken
    Participant

    QUOTE (C.Way @ Jun 14 2010, 07:02 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Thanks for the information, helps a lot, got my p. nagyi few hours earlier, seems to settle well by now

    how does salt affect them in breeding? I’ve been dosing a small amount of salt in all my aquarium set up as a precaution all the while, fishes that live well with paros in the wild like betta seems to have no trouble with it.

    29 or 30 degree is too high for them to breed according to some local hobbyist, but they will still survive(nearly impossible to breed at that temperature), I’m placing them indoor at the moment, air condition will do the trick of lowering the temperature, my back up plan is to shift them to my backyard where water temperature stay constant around 24 to 27 C, but with exposure to little direct sun light and rain

    For plant wise, 3 tanks is prepared for paros, one with purely java moss, one with a mix of java moss and java fern and one with lot of hard leaves litters and java fern

    Was wondering how many locality of p. nagyi is known

    Well its not specifically salt as in NaCl, I was actually thinking of the word minerals but it didnt come to mind when I was writing that last post. The eggs simply won’t hatch if the water isn’t extremely soft and the conducitivity is low, 30-60 µS is ideal. Some species aren’t as sensitive to this though like P. quindecim and P. linkei. The eggs are also very sensitive to attacks from bacteria and fungus, so it might be a good idea to add Catappa leaves to the tank to further decrease the amount of bacteria.

    And yes, Betta breed without any particular problems with salt added, but this is not the case for Parosphromenus. And salt is also not necessary.

    I know of two localities of P. nagyi: Cherating and Kuantan. Their habitat at Kuantan is completely destroyed though and they are believed to be extinct there. There are some people that think that the fish from the Cherating locality is another species different to the one from Kuantan, but I don’t know.

    #318124

    C.Way
    Participant

    QUOTE (oaken @ Jun 16 2010, 07:10 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Well its not specifically salt as in NaCl, I was actually thinking of the word minerals but it didnt come to mind when I was writing that last post. The eggs simply won’t hatch if the water isn’t extremely soft and the conducitivity is low, 30-60 µS is ideal. Some species aren’t as sensitive to this though like P. quindecim and P. linkei. The eggs are also very sensitive to attacks from bacteria and fungus, so it might be a good idea to add Catappa leaves to the tank to further decrease the amount of bacteria.

    And yes, Betta breed without any particular problems with salt added, but this is not the case for Parosphromenus. And salt is also not necessary.

    I know of two localities of P. nagyi: Cherating and Kuantan. Their habitat at Kuantan is completely destroyed though and they are believed to be extinct there. There are some people that think that the fish from the Cherating locality is another species different to the one from Kuantan, but I don’t know.

    Interesting information, very useful indeed, never knew why water hardness is important until you explain it’s importance of providing the right condition for the eggs to hatch, will find out more bout the information soon

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