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Sewellia breeding with or without snails

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Sewellia breeding with or without snails

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  kim m 2 years ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 24 total)
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  • #303800

    kim m
    Participant

    Hi all.

    Having sporadic luck breeding S. linolata and sp. Spotted I am considering to scale up with a few more species.

    I have heard it’s a good idea to have a snail-free tank as snails supposedly eat Sewellia eggs. I have had fry in tanks with snails but maybe some people with more experience with Sewellia could enlighten me a bit more.

    How about shrimp (small Caridina/Neocaridine) …would they possibly have a (negative) effect?

    #355152

    mikev
    Participant

    Shrimp would be far more dangerous than snails.

    (I have snails in both lineolata and spotted tanks and they do not appear to have any negative effect).

    #355153

    kim m
    Participant

    Thanks Mike.

    It is also easier to keep a tank shrimp-free rarther than snail-free πŸ™‚

    #355154

    torso
    Participant

    Hi Kim

    I tried different setups with groups of 8-12 adults.

    Without snails and a thick layer of coarse gravel – gives the best results. I stopped this setup. See below.

    With snails: important is a thick layer of coarse gravel – up to 15 mm diameter. Larger snails can’t enter the substrate, young Planorbarius corneus and Melanoides tuberculatus do. Up to 100-200 specimen in half a year (S. speciosa and S. sp SEW 02 are less productive).

    With snails and sand: some offspring always turns up

    With snails and shrimps: best result with coarse gravel, with sand still some offspring.

    With Hyalella azteca (accidentelly), snails and shrimps: some offspring. Lowest rate of all setups

    Best setup seems to be (didn’t try yet): a thick layer of coarse expanded clay and aspirating every week. As they can easily produce 400-500 eggs per month and given, that S. lineolata and S. sp. spotted are hard to stop once they started to spawn, that leads to a shedload of youngsters. The guys in Germany, who tried it back in 2009 soon stopped the trial.

    I use shrimps to bring down the rate, because to sell offspring in great quantities is not worth the effort as they need about a year to reach a selling size of 4 cm.

    Cheers Charles

    #355155

    kim m
    Participant

    Great input Charles! Thanks πŸ™‚

    Hopefully I am picking up S. marmorata and sp. Spotted tomorrow.

    They are going into some mixed tanks while I set up their species tanks.

    #355160

    kim m
    Participant

    So, visiting a couple of shops this week yielded some S. marmorata, sp. spotted and some imported as S. breviventralis but turned out to be SEW02/03 (need a closer look) and SEW04.

    Quite pleased πŸ™‚

    #355161

    mikev
    Participant

    S. breviventralis name has been used for more than five years now to denote a mix of Sew0203 and Sew04.

    The difference between Sew02 and Sew03 is not to be understood by mere mortals, it belongs to the faith domain. πŸ˜›

    #355164

    kim m
    Participant

    Thanks for enlightenment Mike πŸ™‚

    Until recently, not many Sewellia except lineolata and sp. spotted has been available here so I haven’t followed it too closely.

    #355165

    mikev
    Participant

    Pleasure. Hope you manage to breed some of the new ones.

    One thing realized: hopefully you are not putting them into the same tank. Some are more aggressive than others and may kill other species…. s.lineolata in particular is a bad one.

    #355166

    kim m
    Participant

    They are in seperate tanks πŸ™‚

    Both to avoid agression and to avoid cross-breeding. I don’t know how eager they would be to cross-breed, but I don’t take chances.

    I will post some pics once I get the lighting in my rack fixed. Rebuild my room over the summer and it need the “finishing touch” so to speak πŸ™‚

    #355176

    kim m
    Participant

    So, dug up some old LED lights. Still, the glass is dirty and so on, but it gives an idea. This tank contains S. lineolata.

    The gravel is from a stream at my parents’ farm.

    unnamed.jpg

    #355177

    Matt
    Keymaster

    @mikev said:
    The difference between Sew02 and Sew03 is not to be understood by mere mortals, it belongs to the faith domain. πŸ˜›

    Think they were separated by distance between pelvic and anal fins (a clear separationΒ in SEW02, none in SEW03). Remain unconvinced by that and all could be S. breviventralis.

    #355178

    mikev
    Participant

    There was a discussion somewhere that S. breviventralis may be Sew04. (No point to look for a link, this was a speculation).

    Actually, you reminded me of an item on to-do list… I should show you my alleged S.elongata photos … they finally grew up enough to make me think of Sew05. πŸ˜›

    #355179

    kim m
    Participant

    SEW05? How does that one look?

    I am wondering what species are found in imports on a regular basis? How about a species like pterolineata?

    Any comments on my set-up above? I think it seems to work OK for the fish.

    #355181

    torso
    Participant

    That will do, Kim.

    I my tanks, the waterflow is directed from the right/left corner backside to the front glass. A flat large stone in front – like the one at left – placed in the backflow from the front glass helps the spawning pair to swim up once they cling together. Eggs drive away and fall into the coarse gravel.

    Cheers Charles

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