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Sewellia marmorata

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Sewellia marmorata

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  torso 11 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 31 through 36 (of 36 total)
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  • #355471

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Ah I see in the pic you have no substrate. It’s a bare-bottom tank. I have sand in my lineolata tank, the granules are similar size to the eggs. That’s likely why I’ve never seen them. 🙂 I find the tiny fry in the water change bucket.

    #355472

    torso
    Participant

    @olly said:
     The Sewellia’s eggs are very adhesive and they were glued to the substrate.

    It is likely the egg productivity of a one sewellia is pretty

    That’s interesting Olly. S. lineolata-eggs are at first adhesive too – not very strong – and loose it within some hours. (Frank Strozyk in AMAZONAS 2010)

    Only numbers for the quantity of eggs for S. lineolata date from 2010 (Frank Strozyk in AMAZONAS): 1459 within a month.

    Cheers Charles

    #355473

    olly
    Participant

    You are likely right Jim.

    @plaamoo said:
     🙂 I find the tiny fry in the water change bucket.

    It is great and my congratulations. I like S.lineolata and cannot imagine my tank without them. Amazing fish with interesting behavior.

    #355474

    olly
    Participant

    Thank you for very interesting facts Charles.

    Are such quantity of eggs from one S.lineolata female or from a group (how many?) in this paper? What is the size of S.lineolata female and how many eggs do female release during the one spawning? It is interesting to compare. I didn’t see the new spawnings in my group of S.marmorata for 1,5 months.

    Unfortunately I didn’t watch for the changes in S.marmorata egg adhesiveness. It is interesting why initially adhesive eggs lost their ability to glue within some hours. Fixation of eggs on the open surfaces makes them vulnerable and elevates the chance to be eaten.
    Is this temporary adhesion of eggs on surfaces necessary for fertilization? Eggs of many fishes fall into gravel and they are succesfully fertilized. Or are much oxygen required in first hours of sewellia embryo development? Is something known about that or please share your ideas?

    #355475

    olly
    Participant

     One more idea about temporary adhesiveness of sewellia eggs. The egg ability to glue may prove to be a method for the spreading to new river and for trip by air on legs and feathers of aquatic birds (or insects) to new locations. That may be a cause of appearance of fish in remote region. Such method of migration by air on birds is known in the case of Pungitius platygaster aralehsis. It is likely our hillstream loaches, being in eggs, enjoy such air trips, and later we consider the fishes of one species that were found in distant locations as different species.

    Just a guess.

    #355476

    torso
    Participant

    Hi Olly

    He had a group aof 5,5. You want the article (German)?

    I remember a remark in “Borneo-Suckers” about the counting of follicles in a Gastromyzon-female (Slechtova ?) with some thousends.

    I think, it’s just a question of fertilizing/surviving.

    About spreading: if you were right, “adhesive” species should be wider spread. Doesn’t match with S. marmorata (found in Vinh-Than-River only) and is contradictory to the widespread S. lineolata.

    A guess: S. lineolata is found in trubid and calmer water. May be it developped a less “sticking” method for different conditions. S. marmorat was found in turbid water only.

    Cheers Charles

    S

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