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Synodontis ID

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Synodontis ID

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Dana 2 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #303509

    Dana
    Participant

    Hello all!

    I already asked for ID help in another forum about 1 year ago, but nobody could give me a definite answer. Maybe someone can help me here.

    Short story: I found two Synodontis juveniles in a dealer tank end of Oct. 2012. They were together with wild Synodontis multipunctatus juveniles, but looked different then all the other S. multipunctatus. 

    In the meantime they are about 13 cm (TL) and their body shape remembers somehow of puffers. :-) One of the two got even thicker in the past weeks and I assume it might be a gravid female.
    The other African catfishes (Synodontis petricola, Microsynodontis sp Nigeria) in the tank are normal slim, except for females, only when gravid.

    Best regards

    Dana

    Synodontis-xx-121031_11.JPG

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     Synodontis-xx-140704_07.JPG

     Synodontis-xx-141219_03.JPG

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    #353973

    Matt
    Keymaster

    I would say that they don’t resemble any of the described species. Has the possibility that they are hybrids been mooted?

    #354009

    Dana
    Participant

    Yes Matt, that possibility has been mooted.
    One can never know precisely what happens with fishes while beeing transferred from one dealer to the other. Maybe the two are aquarium hybrids and were just mixed with the S. multipunctatus.
    On the other side, as far as I know, Synodontis hybrids are possible even in the wild.
    Last but not least, I read on africhthy.org that many african species are still not described. I don´t know what to believe.

    #354011

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Yep, hybridisation is quite common in wild fishes and is also a possible mechanism by which speciation, i.e., formation of new species, occurs. Don’t see any reason why this could not occur in Synodontis.

    What do you think?

    #354026

    Martin G.
    Participant

    @matt said:
    Yep, hybridisation is quite common in wild fishes and is also a possible mechanism by which speciation, i.e., formation of new species, occurs. Don’t see any reason why this could not occur in Synodontis.

    What do you think?

    Copied the thread to a facebook group on african catfish. First answer: hybrid of multipunctatus x eupterus. Which is definetily unnatural…

     

    martin

    #354030

    Dana
    Participant

    @martin G. said:

    @matt said:
    Yep, hybridisation is quite common in wild fishes and is also a possible mechanism by which speciation, i.e., formation of new species, occurs. Don’t see any reason why this could not occur in Synodontis.

    What do you think?

    Copied the thread to a facebook group on african catfish. First answer: hybrid of multipunctatus x eupterus. Which is definetily unnatural…

    martin

    Thanks Martin. I have just found the site of an american fish farm, showing several Synodontis hybrids. I never knew there are so many.
    Here is a pic of a S. multipunctatus x eupterus (or is it a S. multipunctatus x decora hybrid?):
    http://www.segrestfarms.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=catalog.productDetail&productID=13900121&Syn.-Eupterus-X-Multipunctatus-Cat-Hybrid-Reg


    &Synodontis-decora-x-Synodontis-multipunctatus.html
    Quite confusing.

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