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TDS

This topic contains 41 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Bluedave 7 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 60 total)
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  • #301048

    JazzBora150
    Participant

    are tds levels important in an aquarium

    i have a digital tds meter and used it

    got a reading of 24 x 10

    ive no idea if this has any relevence in my aquarium

    other parameters were

    nitrite 0 ppm
    nitrate 0 ppm
    ammonia 0.25 ppm
    ph 7.6

    do these all look ok

    #320586

    Jarcave
    Participant

    QUOTE (JazzBora150 @ Jan 12 2011, 09:13 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    are tds levels important in an aquarium

    i have a digital tds meter and used it

    got a reading of 24 x 10

    ive no idea if this has any relevence in my aquarium

    other parameters were

    nitrite 0 ppm
    nitrate 0 ppm
    ammonia 0.25 ppm
    ph 7.6

    do these all look ok

    TDS is important.

    An ammonia reading of 0.25 is not good. Did you take this test after heavy feeding? Is this a new tank?

    #320589

    JazzBora150
    Participant

    yes it was done after a feed about 2 hours or so

    what would a good level of tds be

    how do you adjust it

    yes tank is about 9 weeks old

    #320592

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Water chemistry in aquariums is complicated, I’m also trying to get my head around it.
    I use my Total Dissolved Solids meter often. It measures the TDS but doesn’t tell you what those solids are. You’ll need specific tests for that. Measure your tap water, then measure your tank water and compare. Those numbers you posted don’t make sense to me. Mine reads one number, I believe its PPM? My tap water comes out about 50, and my tanks range from 70-100. Depending on substrate, rocks, etc. and whether or not it’s due for a water change. My water is very soft.
    I use the TDS meter to test new rocks for leaching. When getting new fish I test the water in the bag and the degree of difference between bag water & my tank tells me how long & slow to acclimate them. TDS is relative to KH & GH and they to PH. Quick changes can cause osmotic shock, problems with the way fish regulate water in their system. This is just a bit of how I understand it’s importance. If anyone cares to add please do and feel free to correct if I’m mistaken.

    As Jarcave said there shouldn’t be any ammonia present. Is your test kit a good one? Any changes to the tank that would affect the biofilter? Have you added a load of new fish?? I’d do daily tests and water changes to get that ammonia down/gone & hopefully the biofilter will catch up.

    #320620

    JazzBora150
    Participant

    i think that my tds is 240 and my tap is 130

    my meter gives me a 2 digit read out and it says on meter x 10 ppm

    so im presuming that my reading of 24 is 240 and tap is 13 which therefore would be 130

    ill start doing a small water change every other day

    has anyone else got any suggestions

    #320626

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    My first thought is that your rocks are leaching. Before I add anything like that to a tank, I put it in a bucket of water for a few days and monitor the TDS.

    #320633

    JazzBora150
    Participant

    i wasnt aware that they would leech anything into the water

    should i remove them?

    #320643

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Not sure I’d go that far yet? I’m just guessing at the rocks. I’d like to hear another opinion? The difference of 110 ppm doesn’t sound dangerous to me. Do you have KH & GH tests?

    #320644

    MatsP
    Participant

    TDS is one of many components in water chemistry. It’s easy to measure, and as long as the water is reasonably “natural” in composition, you can also tell if the water is likely to be acidic or alkaline.

    Whether your 250 ppm TDS would be better at a lower level or not would depend on the fish kept in the tank.


    Mats

    #320654

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Mats, don’t we need to take it a step further and determine what comprises the dissolved solids to relate it to fish in that context?

    #320656

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Good point Jim. Eggs of the Cualac tesselatus I have fail to develop embryos unless there are plenty of sulphates in the water, for example.

    #320688

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    I’ve done some reading on this but it’s complicated. From what i read, TDS is a very broad measurement and can comprise everything from fish waste to water conditioners to mineral content.

    It seems the most commonly applied aspect of this in aquariums would be KH, GH, and their relation to pH. I know of at least one aquarist who uses TDS readings in place of nitrate tests to guage the need for water changes.

    http://www.waterfiltersonline.com/tds-sources.asp#what

    Where do Dissolved Solids come from?

    1. Some dissolved solids come from organic sources such as leaves, silt, plankton, and industrial waste and sewage. Other sources come from runoff from urban areas, road salts used on street during the winter, and fertilizers and pesticides used on lawns and farms.

    2. Dissolved solids also come from inorganic materials such as rocks and air that may contain calcium bicarbonate, nitrogen, iron phosphorous, sulfur, and other minerals. Many of these materials form salts, which are compounds that contain both a metal and a nonmetal. Salts usually dissolve in water forming ions. Ions are particles that have a positive or negative charge.

    3. Water may also pick up metals such as lead or copper as they travel through pipes used to distribute water to consumers.

    Some interesting reading on water quality & osmoregulation. I need to read it a few more times http://www.fishdoc.co.uk/water/open_systems.html

    #320689

    MatsP
    Participant

    QUOTE (plaamoo @ Jan 13 2011, 11:16 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Mats, don’t we need to take it a step further and determine what comprises the dissolved solids to relate it to fish in that context?

    Technically, yes. But if we are talkinga about whater that comes out of a tap in a home in Western Europe or North America (in the main), the water will be vastly controlled by Calcium and Magnesium Carbonate, which is GH/KH contributors. At least in all the water reports I’ve looked at, this is the case. I’m sure there are some areas that have “strange” water, but it’s quite rare to find.

    With regards to your long list of “what makes TDS”, the minerals are the big contributor. If you have more than ppb of for example lead, you’d better have a chat with your water company and get your water feed replaced. Copper can dissolve in soft water, but very little in hard water, and certainly not to a level that makes any noticable difference to the overall reading for the purpose of determining whether the water is OK for a certain species of fish, from an overall TDS measurement – of course, if the water has a high level of copper in the water, it will be bad for fish (especially fry).

    But it’s correct that not ALL of the TDS is GH or KH.


    Mats

    #320696

    Colin
    Participant

    i use a TDS meter but only to test my RO/DI water to make sure it is working and I am getting 0 ppm.

    TDS could mean anything – it could be 200ppm liquid gold or yoghurt for all the meter tells us.

    It is only useful for making sure that water for water changes is as close to zero as you need it or that very sensitive fish such as the Betta macrostoma have as few containments as possible in the water. E.g. my macrostoma tanks sit at about 20ppm.

    In regards to GH and KH my tap water is 1 and RO/DI water is 0 so it is nothing to do with that which makes my tapwater have a TDS of 70 or so

    cheers

    #320706

    MatsP
    Participant

    QUOTE (Colin @ Jan 14 2011, 08:19 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    i use a TDS meter but only to test my RO/DI water to make sure it is working and I am getting 0 ppm.

    TDS could mean anything – it could be 200ppm liquid gold or yoghurt for all the meter tells us.

    It is only useful for making sure that water for water changes is as close to zero as you need it or that very sensitive fish such as the Betta macrostoma have as few containments as possible in the water. E.g. my macrostoma tanks sit at about 20ppm.

    In regards to GH and KH my tap water is 1 and RO/DI water is 0 so it is nothing to do with that which makes my tapwater have a TDS of 70 or so

    cheers

    GH/KH is 1ppm or 1 dKH/dGH? I guess the latter. Clearly when you have a LOW TDS, the components that are NOT GH/KH will have a greater impact – do you know what the other components are? In soft water, the water company often adds

    Clearly, you’d see if it had 200ppm yoghurt (or at least almost) and gold is pretty rare in soluble form, so I doubt that is the case either. I can literally guarantee that there is no tap or well-water in Western Europe or North America that contains any measureable amount of gold.

    But sure, technically, a TDS meter tells you NOTHING useful other than (using a meter) the conductivity of the water – if using the proper lab method (180’C drying and weighing the residue), it tells you a little bit more, but not a whole lot more.

    The only way to actually know what is in the water is to measure and analyze every detail of it. Or at least the ones you care about.

    I use the TDS meter when making water changes, to validate my mix of water and RO-re-constituing minerals. I also check the RO unit is working (I get 15 ppm, which is related to the facts that: 1) I live where the water comes out around 350-400ppm in the tap, 2) I don’t have a DI unit – nor do I need one for the fish I keep).


    Mats

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