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To Kill Or Not To Kill?

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes To Kill Or Not To Kill?

This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Matt 7 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #300421

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    There is a very interesting discussion going on at yahoogobygroup, mostly by scientist/taxonomist members, about killing fish for science, or not. Here’s a link.
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/gobygroup/messages?o=1

    #315507

    Matt
    Keymaster

    The most interesting point for me was Neale Monks saying it’s important for scientists to stay in touch with the public. Now while I appreciate that if I were a professional ichthyologist I certainly wouldn’t want 1000 emails on guppies each day (an exaggeration, but you get my point), it’d be great to have a few more of them regularly using sites like Petfrd (and maybe one day this one). They’re all a busy bunch, I guess…

    On the issue of killing fish for science, I can understand why they have to sacrifice specimens for a type series, but when I read some papers where they use electrofishing to sample the species diversity of a river or something it really makes me want to kick the dog…

    How about you, Jim?

    #315512

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ Nov 10 2009, 05:38 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    The most interesting point for me was Neale Monks saying it’s important for scientists to stay in touch with the public. Now while I appreciate that if I were a professional ichthyologist I certainly wouldn’t want 1000 emails on guppies each day (an exaggeration, but you get my point), it’d be great to have a few more of them regularly using sites like Petfrd (and maybe one day this one). They’re all a busy bunch, I guess…

    On the issue of killing fish for science, I can understand why they have to sacrifice specimens for a type series, but when I read some papers where they use electrofishing to sample the species diversity of a river or something it really makes me want to kick the dog…

    How about you, Jim?

    Agree with both your points Matt.

    It would be great to get a taxonomist or 2 or 3 contributing regularly. They do seem to be busy and getting replies on the goby group is hit and miss and can take quite a while. Might be worth a try to make contact with a few personally and see if you get a response? These are mostly goby people as far as I know(Peter Unmack studies rainbows I believe) and the only taxonomists that I’ve had any(minimal)contact with. There must be places to contact those studying other fish.

    Electro-fishing and the use of rotenone etc. sound like terrible ideas though I have no personal experience. I’m glad to see these folks discussing the issue and that they all seem to have these ethical questions in mind while conducting their studies.

    #315516

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Thing is Jim what do you say to them? “Hey there Maurice, I’ve got this really cool website with about 20 active members but they’re all really interested in fish! Fancy joining?”

    #315517

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    I think you could do a little better than that Matt http://rainbow-fish.org/forums/index.php?s…a07997948d891a2 that i check in with on occasion and they seem to have Tony Gill’s ear. He shows up with help on goby IDs.

    #315521

    Bully
    Participant

    That was a good link, I had an enjoyable read

    #315523

    Matt
    Keymaster

    I guess the other problem we face is that we’re quite a generalised site whereas the more specialised sites might find it easier to attract experts in their particular field. Definite food for thought though…

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