LOGIN

RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube
GLOSSARY       

SEARCHGLOSSARY

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

PROFILESEARCH

Tom's Bucket O' Mud

Home Forums My Aquarium Tom's Bucket O' Mud

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  BigTom 3 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 171 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #301634

    BigTom
    Participant

    I thought as I’d signed up in order to see all the excellent photos and information on here that I should probably make a contribution!

    Here are some shots of the inhabitants of my largely self sustaining setup, which is 3′ x 3′ square and 1′ high. Planted with a wide variety of submerged, emergent and riparian plants and populated by 4 Otocinclus affinis, 6 Parosphromenus ‘sintangensis’ (thanks Colin!), 7 Bororas maculatus, several hundred cherry shrimp and a bunch of other microfauna.

    Unfiltered, but heated and lit. I do sometimes provide some supplemental feeding, but am often away from home for 6 weeks or so, in which case it looks after itself. It’s been running since last Christmas, so far so good!

    Parosphromenus ‘sintangensis’ (male) :

    Parosphromenus ‘sintangensis’ (female):

    Bororas maculatus (male):

    Otocinclus affinis:

    Neocaridina heteropoda var. “red” (female):

    And where they all live:

    #344900

    ender2811
    Participant

    Very interesting setup

    #344903

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Very cool indeed. What other visible forms of microfauna have you seen?

    #344904

    BigTom
    Participant

    Thanks. Yep, baby cherries are one of the important food sources. There are also several types of snail, planaria, gammarus, hyella, a species of benthic daphnia, ostracods, cyclops, nematodes, some sort of little black crustacea that live underneath the floating plants, and even a couple of leeches that I removed. Some i added deliberately, many just came in on plants.

    EDIT – ender, I change maybe 20% every couple of months, other than that I just top off the evaporation.

    #344905

    Colin
    Participant

    Hi Tom, good to see the progress here too

    #344906

    BigTom
    Participant

    Ah yes, they’re in there too! To be honest, haven’t really spotted them since they went in, same with the native gammarus and the hyella. Hopefully they’re under the leaf litter somewhere and didn’t all get instantly munched on.

    #344913

    oaken
    Participant

    So cool! More pics of the tank please

    #344914

    BigTom
    Participant

    Need to get some new ones of the tank, will update sometime this week.

    #344976

    coelacanth
    Participant

    Lovely and very unusual display, more pictures would be most appreciated.

    #345499

    BigTom
    Participant

    I got myself a new toy last weekend (Panasonic GH2), and decided to point it at the tank whilst figuring out what all the buttons did. As a crash course in videography it actually made a very useful subject.

    The footage is pretty rough because it’s so dimly lit that i had to shoot at about 10fps and interpolate the extra frames, but I know some people have been asking for a video of the tank and inhabitants, so here you go!

    Welcome to the premiere of my debut film, “Parosphromenus: A love story (in 2 parts)” http://vimeo.com/30028289

    Is it possible to embed vimeo links?

    PS. I apologise if this isn’t ‘serious’ enough, there are fish involved though

    #345503

    BallAquatics
    Participant

    That’s brilliant Tom, loved every minute of it!

    Dennis

    #345504

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Excellent! Would love to hear more details about how you set up and maintain this little garden of Eden!

    #345506

    BigTom
    Participant

    Cheers guys.

    Plaamoo, it’s all pretty straightforward. Just takes a while for everything to mature. Substrate is a lean compost cut 50/50 with sand and capped with pure sand. Hardsape is just rocks and locally collected heather twigs. Emergent plants are either planted in the substrate or in shower caddies filled with hydroton and attached to the side. Some of these are just normal houseplants from the garden center, which take a few weeks to adjust to aquaculture (they have to grow new root systems). Lighting is a 70 Watt metal halide suspended 2 feet above the water (cheapshop spot light from ebay), which gives reasonable penetration without being too bright for the gouramis.

    Once everything was planted I waited about a month for the plants to adapt and for the initial ammonia spike to pass then added the shrimp, otos and a few other inverts – lots had arrived already on the aquatic plants. Once the shrimp population was looking good (about 3 months in) I added the rasboras, then the gouramis after another month or so when I was sure the food chain was stable.

    Tank is now 10 months old and doesn’t require any more maintenance than topping up the water and replacing the beech, oak and ketapang leaves as they are broken down. I do do a small water change every couple of months and supplement the feeding a bit when I happen to be home, but I don’t feel it’s essential.

    #345507

    Matt
    Keymaster

    It’s a really interesting set-up – great video too!

    #345513

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Thanks Tom! Sounds really simple.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 171 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.