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Tom’s Poco Pozo

Home Forums My Aquarium Tom’s Poco Pozo

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Alex M. 1 year, 9 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 86 total)
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  • #354212

    BigTom
    Participant

    Yeah I’m already seeing a positive response from the hairgrass. My previous experience suggests that having sufficient flow can make a critical difference between success and failure when growing some of the trickier carpet plants, even low tech.

    #354215

    JK91
    Participant

    Interesting. Good to know a stronger filtration helps the plants grow and free from debris (as I write it now, it all seems pretty obvious). 

    Last question, regarding the wood you use in your tank. Here in The Netherlands, it’s common to buy the wood in store or online. Getting the wood from a forest is an absolute no-go. In your older thread, you pictured yourself with a trunk, later using it in a tank, so I’m curious if you got this wood from somewhere outside? Maybe it’s the same trunk as before?

    #354216

    Barb Man
    Participant

    Yes literally my dream tank aside from the neons I don’t really care for tetra but they are native along with some of the other fish so I know why you would add them as well as they are very bright. I love the mini earth eaters. I only have rams now but I would love to move up to full Geophagus in the future. All in one? Is it rated on the NPK scale at like 10-10-10? I need something for my thirty gallon because mine is all sand also and I can barely get anubias and java ferns to grow. I have a lucky bamboo and a foot of elodea in there but if they show any signs of dying I’m going to pull them out. The thirty is housing a mix of random fish. The odd visitor is a two inch peacock bass that I’m holding for my monster buddy. I have lots of white cload and he wanted to know if they would grow faster if they were fed live completely. I would love to see you get like twenty or more otocinclus when the farowella leave us but that might not be for a while.

    #354217

    BigTom
    Participant

    The very large stump (best guess is some sort of spruce) and about half the other wood in the tank is self collected (some ivy and a couple of very weathered pieces that I can’t identify). There is also a fair amount of American manzanita (very popular with aquascapers) which I won cheaply on ebay. I use a lot of heather in my smaller tanks, and there are lots of little twigs of different kinds from the garden.

    A lot of aquarium ‘lore’ will tell you that things like spruce and ivy are a no go, but I’ve been using them for years and have encountered no issues (except for ivy starting to decay after a year or two). As long as the wood is well dead and dry (not rotting), then I generally do not worry too much.

    Here is the big stump I collected, with the manzanita ‘roots’ –

    https://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/600x800q90/829/6hfg.jpg

    #354218

    BigTom
    Participant

    @barb Man said:
    Yes literally my dream tank aside from the neons I don’t really care for tetra but they are native along with some of the other fish so I know why you would add them as well as they are very bright. I love the mini earth eaters. I only have rams now but I would love to move up to full Geophagus in the future. All in one? Is it rated on the NPK scale at like 10-10-10? I need something for my thirty gallon because mine is all sand also and I can barely get anubias and java ferns to grow. I have a lucky bamboo and a foot of elodea in there but if they show any signs of dying I’m going to pull them out. The thirty is housing a mix of random fish. The odd visitor is a two inch peacock bass that I’m holding for my monster buddy. I have lots of white cload and he wanted to know if they would grow faster if they were fed live completely. I would love to see you get like twenty or more otocinclus when the farowella leave us but that might not be for a while.

     

    There are already 12 otocinclus in there. They are fat and lazy and hence I don’t see much of them. I may get another dozen at some point.

    This is the fert I use, 5ml per day – http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/LUSH-Max-Aquatic-Fertiliser-1-litre-Aquarium-Plant-Food-Fish-Tank-Fertilizer-/291377257438?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item43d7701bde

    #354219

    BigTom
    Participant

    Two more shots of the nicest A. hognei pair (in a separate breeding tank for now) –

    http://imageshack.com/a/img538/1497/ayY6es.jpg

    http://imageshack.com/a/img538/6239/43WNm1.jpg

    #354221

    BillT
    Participant

    I have also just started dosing home-made liquid carbon (gluteraldehyde solution) as a bit of an experiment as I;ve never used it before and it’s very cheap.

    Whats the logic behind using gluteraldehyde?

    I would assume there are a lot of alternative chemicals that could be used as a carbon source (like alcohol).

    My familiarity with gluteraldehyde comes from doing histology where it is a very strong fixative (cross linking protein and other chemicals via amino groups). Its kind of toxic. As is formaldehyde which is used to treat some external pathogens.

    #354222

    BigTom
    Participant

    @BillT said:

    I have also just started dosing home-made liquid carbon (gluteraldehyde solution) as a bit of an experiment as I;ve never used it before and it’s very cheap.

    Whats the logic behind using gluteraldehyde?
    I would assume there are a lot of alternative chemicals that could be used as a carbon source (like alcohol).
    My familiarity with gluteraldehyde comes from doing histology where it is a very strong fixative (cross linking protein and other chemicals via amino groups). Its kind of toxic. As is formaldehyde which is used to treat some external pathogens.

     

    Gluteraldehyde (or various isomers of) is the primary active ingredient in commercial ‘liquid carbon’ supplements such as Excel and Easycarbo. It is absorbed by the plants and broken down to access the carbon – not as effective as co2 injection but can give significantly faster growth rates than typical low tech tanks. It has the happy side effect of also being an algaecide, although I don’t have an issue with algae.

    It is pretty toxic stuff, but typical aquarium dosing concentrations are around 1-2mg/l.

    I’m erring on the side of caution and dosing it at approx 0.3mg/l, which is below the No Observed Effect Concentration for inverts – http://www.inchem.org/documents/sids/sids/111308.pdf

    I don’t know enough chemistry to suggest why it is the compound of choice for liquid carbon.

    #354223

    BillT
    Participant

    Intreesting. Not something I was aware of.

    I don’t know enough chemistry to suggest why it is the compound of choice for liquid carbon.

    In histology, it makes covalent bonds most frequently to amino groups on amino acids in different proteins or different locations on the same protein. It does this much more strongly than formaldehyde because it has two COH groups separated by 3 carbons (total of 5 carbons). Formaldehyde has only one COH and only one carbon. They both will react more strongly at higher pH’s. In fixing tissue (at a high concentration) glut will immobilize proteins by making a cross-linked mass and changing the chemistry of the amino groups they react with, often making the protein insoluble. Formaldehyde will mostly make one link and act through solubility changes.

    I would expect glutaraldehyde to react with something pretty quickly in a mature aquarium. It may also react with ammonia floating around in the water.

    I have no idea how this might get the carbon into plants. Perhaps bacterial degradation of the modified proteins.

    Denitrifying filters (filters that use bacteria to remove nitrates by turning them into nitrogen gas (or other things)) use a carbon source (often carbs or alcohol) that is fed to the bacteria in a oxygen depleted filter space. The bacteria use the carbon from the carbon source and the oxygen from the mitrates.

    #354224

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-confused009.gif

    #354230

    BigTom
    Participant

    As you say Bill it is pretty reactive – I don’t think anyone has established the precise reaction pathways either outwith or within the plant, although there seems to be some assumption that it is absorbed directly by the plant. Also it is generally quoted as being largely degraded within about 12 hours of adding to the aquarium, but I have no idea what data that comes from.

    #354263

    BigTom
    Participant

    Some fish –

    http://imageshack.com/a/img661/3454/6Lscjj.jpg

    http://imageshack.com/a/img673/6832/n5OClL.jpg

    http://imageshack.com/a/img911/9841/UM3ZHl.jpg

    http://imageshack.com/a/img537/1545/MAJ5cv.jpg

    http://imageshack.com/a/img633/3033/eSkGjZ.jpg

    http://imageshack.com/a/img631/8941/v5787B.jpg

    #354264

    BigTom
    Participant

    And how it looks in the evening with just the spotlights on. Added some Ludwigia arcuata and ‘giant hairgrass’ –

    http://imageshack.com/a/img540/1374/euRbzB.jpg

    #354265

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    I would like to caution you on using glutaraldehyde.  This is a highly toxic disinfectant used in hospitals to kill bacteria, in anti-freeze, in embalming fluid to kill bacteria, and in ship ballasts for the same purpose when a ship travels into another ocean.  You have some beautiful fish, and some very sensitive ones.  I see no benefit in risking them.

    I understand some aquarists use this, but that does not mean it is wise to do so.  Seachem’s Excel and API’s CO2 Booster are glutaraldehyde and water (so it is somewhat diluted), yet even at recommended dosage some plants (Vallinseria is one) will be killed outright.  The fact that this product can kill algae should sound warning bells.  If it happens to be overdosed, it can kill bacteria, plants and fish.

    Given the high interrelationship between fish physiology and water, I cannot understand anyone putting such a product in a tank with live fish.  I’m not suggesting they will die, obviously some people use this product and the fish manage, but at what cost to the fish?  Fish sometimes survive cycling issues too, but that does not mean it is safe nor advisable.

    Just my opinion, which I can expect will not be shared by everyone.  But I am concerned about my fish, and I see no reason to jeopardize them by adding toxins to the tank for any reason.

    Byron.

    #354266

    BigTom
    Participant

    Hi Byron,

    Thanks for your concern, and I totally understand your viewpoint. However I have done my research, and am dosing at a level that is significantly below described No Observed Effect Concentrations for algae, fish and invertebrates. I also dose this (at a slightly higher concentration) in some of the display tanks in the LFS in which I work and have observed no noticeable effect on the health of fish and breeding of invertebrates therein. Furthermore it is rapidly biodegraded in an aquarium, so even these concentrations are a maximum which should drop rapidly. It also hasn’t prevented my fish from breeding; just yesterday I spotted another N. eques fry only a few mm long.

    I do of course monitor my fish closely (I’m sat right next to the tank for much of the time) and if I perceived any issues I’d be sure to halt dosing.

    Cheers, T 

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 86 total)

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