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Trade of ornamental crayfish in Europe as a possible introduction pathway for important crustacean diseases

Home Forums Invertebrates & Other Critters Trade of ornamental crayfish in Europe as a possible introduction pathway for important crustacean diseases

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  plesner 2 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #303619

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Biological Invasions 17(5)

    Abstract

    Rapidly growing trade of ornamental animals may represent an entry pathway for emerging pathogens; this may concern freshwater crayfish that are increasingly popular pets. Infected crayfish and contaminated water from aquaria may be released to open waters, thus endangering native crustacean fauna. We tested whether various non-European crayfish species available in the pet trade in Germany and the Czech Republic are carriers of two significant crustacean pathogens, the crayfish plague agent Aphanomyces astaci and the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The former infects primarily freshwater crayfish (causing substantial losses in native European species), the latter is particularly known for economic losses in shrimp aquacultures. We screened 242 individuals of 19 North American and Australasian crayfish taxa (the identity of which was validated by DNA barcoding) for these pathogens, using molecular methods recommended by the World Organisation for Animal Health. A. astaci DNA was detected in eight American and one Australian crayfish species, comprising in total 27 % of screened batches. Furthermore, viability of A. astaciwas confirmed by its isolation to axenic cultures from three host taxa, including the parthenogenetic invader Marmorkrebs (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis). In contrast, WSSV was only confirmed in three individuals of Australian Cherax quadricarinatus. Despite modest prevalence of detected infections, our results demonstrate the potential of disease entry and spread through this pathway, and should be considered if any trade regulations are imposed. Our study highlights the need for screening for pathogens in the ornamental trade as one of the steps to prevent the transmission of emerging diseases to wildlife.

    #354497

    plesner
    Participant

    A couple of years ago, I translated a German article on Procambarus fallax f. virginalis (Marmorkrebs) into Danish. I did it just to do my bit to spread the word on the possible danger of introducing Aphanomyces astaci (crayfish plague agent) into native waters by keeping the aforementioned crayfish in captivity.

    The German article can be found here.

    #354510

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Thanks for the link Karsten. Are infected animals treatable at all?

    #354516

    plesner
    Participant

    @matt said:
    Thanks for the link Karsten. Are infected animals treatable at all?

    I don’t have any personal experience with treating crayfish plague. According to a number of texts found using Google, it does seem that they are treatable.

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