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Velvet?

This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Hokum 8 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #300837

    Hokum
    Participant

    I have had itchy WCMM and Glowlight danios for about 6 months. Nothing seems to be wrong physically, but they flash every once in a while. It seems to effect all fish but they are still looking healthy and breeding. Could it be velvet or something else? I’ve noticed my hillstream loach have golden markings near their dorsal fin but nowhere else and again seem to be healthy.

    It’s been like this since about March but i’m worried now after a user on another forum mentioned velvet and the golden marks on the hillstreams do kind of match the description. Nothings died, looks distressed, breathing hard or at the surface.

    My question is should a treat for velvet or do something else eg use a UV steriliser which wont effect my snails etc.

    Here is a picture of one of my Hillstream loach, you can see the gold but it doesn’t seem to be Velvel to my eye?

    #318785

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    That sewellia looks perfect to me, natural coloring. See what others think?

    You should add the tank size, parameters, maintenance schedule here too so members can make informed suggestions. I read your thread elswhere so I remember some. You mentioned that they only do this when the lights are on? What are the wattage per tank size and color temp? Might try another light??

    In my experience, fish “flash” for many reasons. It’s not always a sign of parasites but can be a natural display of annoyance as towards another fish, a contaminate/skin irritant accidently added, or any number of other issues.

    #318786

    Hokum
    Participant

    QUOTE (plaamoo @ Sep 9 2010, 09:26 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    That sewellia looks perfect to me, natural coloring. See what others think?

    You should add the tank size, parameters, maintenance schedule here too so members can make informed suggestions. I read your thread elswhere so I remember some. You mentioned that they only do this when the lights are on? What are the wattage per tank size and color temp? Might try another light??

    In my experience, fish “flash” for many reasons. It’s not always a sign of parasites but can be a natural display of annoyance as towards another fish, a contaminate/skin irritant accidently added, or any number of other issues.

    Thanks, hmm the tank is a 36″x12″x18″ 100 litre, params are 0 NH3 0 NO2 and 30ppm NO3 PHis stable 7.4 Phosphates are about 3ppm. I haven’t got a hardness test kit but my water is soft.

    Filtration is an Aquaball 130 and an aquaclear 50 powerhead with a quickfilter on the other side of the tank setup as a river manifold.

    Lighting is a 39W 34″ T5HO, it’s an Aqua one marked as tropical… no K rating…

    I have a mix of stones in the tank and plants too, have a look at my video on the pictures and video’s forum to see the layout.

    Oddly i’ve been watching my fish a lot tonight and only noticed the flashing once… its really got me stumped.

    #318823

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Hey Hokum, I was hoping for some other opinions but from what I can see there’s not a lot to say. Your tank looks good. The nitrates are a bit high at 30, try to get them down under 20 with water changes. That may be enough to make them flash now & then. In my experience those aquaclear quick filter inserts clog up quickly so keep an eye on that, I prefer sponges myself… easier to keep clean. What’s the tank temp? I wouldn’t medicate the tank, just keep an eye on them for now.

    #318826

    MatsP
    Participant

    QUOTE (plaamoo @ Sep 11 2010, 02:41 PM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    The nitrates are a bit high at 30, try to get them down under 20 with water changes.

    Whilst nitrates of 30 isn’t ideal, in parts of England, it’s nigh on impossible to get much under 40 ppm without expensive solutions such as RO system, nitrate removal compounds or some such. That’s because the nitrate level in the tap-water itself is 35 ppm.


    Mats

    #318827

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Interesting^, do you just live with it? Or more appropriately, do the fish live with it without serious problems?

    #318828

    MatsP
    Participant

    Most fish commonly sold in the trade tolerate up to about 50 ppm.

    I use RO to reduce both nitrates and hardness in one fell-swoop, but I also put the less sensitive species in tanks that get the waste-water from the RO system – the nitrate level is a little higher in the waste-water than in the original tap-water, but because the system is automatically water-changing itself (continous drip from the RO system, used water gets drained through an overflow), and the tanks get 100% new water every 1.5-2 days, the nitrate level remains low, rather than building up between water changes. [1]

    In an ideal world, I’d use low-nitrate water too. But you can’t choose what the water is like out of the tap – well, you CAN, but it involves a lot of expensive moving, and if you work someplace, it can be hard to find water in that area that is suitable for the fish you want to keep!

    [1] Currently this system is not in use due to me separating from my wife, so parts of my fish-room is in my new home, and parts of it is my old home…


    Mats

    #318830

    Nomad
    Participant

    The first thing to say is it’s definitely not velvet. If it was and had been ongoing for as long as you say, the fish would all be dead or covered in a dusty layer of golden/yellow dots.

    As has been said, there are a variety of reasons fish may flash. I presume by flash, you mean actually flicking against wood or a rock or plant to scratch themselves, not just flashing mid-water…

    The first of these reasons is disease. This should also be the least likely if proper measures are taken in prevention. The first thing all aquarists should do is to get a second setup, tank, heater and airdriven box filter. This should then be set up as a hospital/quarantine tank with water parameters the same as the main tank. All new fish should be kept on this tank for a fortnight after purchase and they should be observed closely during this period. Most communicable diseases and any parasites should become obvious during this time. If you do happen to get a disease showing in your main tank, treatment should occur in this hospital tank, with only profilactic measures being carried out in the main. The seperation of the fish enables you to medicate without fear of damaging your bacteria or other invertebrates. A snail die off can cause huge problems as the rot in the gravel. It also allows the fish to recuperate without being hassled by tank mates.

    The next is high ammonia, nitrite or nitrate, but you seem to have those pretty much under control.

    Next we come to a common one, airbourne or otherwise introduced pollutants. Aerosol spray is the most common offender. Cleaners, insecticides and air fresheners in particular. I had a client who lost a whole tank of mixed Aulonocara which had been running steady for a couple of years. After eliminating everything else, we were left with the plug in air freshener his wife had installed a couple of days prior to the loss. Taking it with me, I set it and a tank with a pseudotropeus in it up in a room and left it. Within a day and a half, the fish was showing obvious signs of ditress, flicking on the rock and gasping. I put it back in its usual tank and within minutes it was behaving normally, psychotic to a fault. Soaps, oils, petrochemicals, some plastics, deoderants, paint and many other common products are also sources of pollutants.

    Then we have the one I like most. Fish get itchy and have no fingernails…

    I also believe certain fish will rub to mark a territory. I have noticed riverine cichlids often rub in the smae place on a semi-regular basis and wonder if they are laying down a slime-trail…

    Regular water changes, coupled with thourough gravel vacuumin works wonders for all problems. Just don’t make the changes too big, and do them often.

    #318873

    Hokum
    Participant

    Thanks for the replies, I lost track of the thread. I’ve started doing a 30% rather than 20% weekly change in water and the flashing seems to of reduced. No aerosols are used in the house.

    I wonder if it could of been due to soap on my hands maybe? I’m always areful and rinse my hands in just water before i do anything in the tank, but it could of been under nails etc.

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