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deepinpeat

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Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
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  • in reply to: How to culture daphnia? #353733

    deepinpeat
    Participant

    @F. Lange Santos said:
    Guys, unfortunately my daphnia culture collapsed, do not know why yet …

    Daphnia cultures collapse quite easily usually when you overfeed. When starting the culture you need to feed very little quite often. If you feel like you feed very little use tests to keep a track of how quickly the nitrogen substances concentrations go up and what is to much. It is very good to have live algae cultures to feed them becouse it is way safer than any “dead” food that decomposes quickly. Use as big tanks as possible and try big bubble aeration. High oxygen levels will allow for higher densities and easier feeding aftewords + the food is equally suspended. Using waste water from tanks, that contains some nitrification bacteria helps too. Always have couple cultures running and keep one low density culture for safety. Moina is much easier to culture and probably better if you do not need big mouthfuls for specific reasons. Still not as easy as people think without experiance.

    in reply to: Tom’s Poco Pozo #353534

    deepinpeat
    Participant

    This is just awsome :) GJ 

    in reply to: What algae for Stiphodon spp #353533

    deepinpeat
    Participant

    Hey, 

    What you can do is go for a walk and find some water bodies or even puddles where you can collect stuff with sessile algae. Best is to collect couple different types from different places. Dependent on current weather and light conditions where you live, you can culture these either outdoors or in a special tank. How its done. Get a liquid NPK combined fertilizer (with microelements) the version for the growths of young plants (high in N). Use the lowest concentration for the plants, that should do the work and place the stones or whatever in there. Be carefull with direct sunlight, this could start a growth of “greenwater” that is worthless for you and and could inhibit the growth of the sessile algae. Use different buckets for different algae,some may be easier to cultivate then others, some may relase substances that would destroy other algae and so on. If you want a “top notch product” , once you grow the algae on stones, place these to some bucket with clean water that has 0 levels of macroelements for about 3 days. This will make the algae to create stocking substances like fats and starches. Than you can place them in to the actual tank for feeding. What is most important: For most algae eaters the most valuable food source are the sessile Rotifera and other microorganisms populations on the surface of the algae that feed on algae itself. True algae are very uneasy to digest for higher organisms. These rotifiers make the nutrients available for higher organisms and of course the more nutritious algae you grow, the more nutritious are the critters feeding on them. Hope that helps.

    You could also culture the sessile Rotifera as such, using the methods that are used for well known fresh and saltwater cultures, e.g. green water, yeast and stuff, I am sure it would work gerat for conditioning them, it is just a little harder to cultivate them as their are much quite easy to kill when you overfeed the culture. But still definitely worth trying, you can obtain the the starting culture the same way as with algae. Of course if you cycle stones in the tank you will probably end up contaminating the algae cultures and culturing a mix anyways.   

     

     

     


    deepinpeat
    Participant

    first be willing to make rich someone who will build a huge enough tank for them so that you could keep them at least for 2-3 years before you pass them to some public aquarium. They are one of the biggest freshwater species and in normal aquarium you will only make them suffer. + when fed properly they will grow pretty fast. In my eyes this not aquarium fish at all unless you have couple thousand gallons tank for them. Reconsider it. 

    in reply to: Nannostomus – adipose fin #353077

    deepinpeat
    Participant

    Did anyone consider this could be a mutation caused by some endogenous factor or such mutation already fixed in an aquarium population? Where did the breeders come from + if they were wild cought are you sure they come form the some population? Some populations species may also be able to crossbreed. I know a guy offering N.mortenthalleri x N.beckfordi hybrids. Def interresting stuff here, glad to find such a forum. 

     

    Pavel

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)