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JK91

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)
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  • in reply to: Tom’s Poco Pozo #354952

    JK91
    Participant

    Did they catch them at the same place or did the LFS just put them together? Would be odd if they’d be caught at the same place, meaning hybrids could appear in nature, like they could in your tank. What’s nature’s point of that?

    Still, well done man! Seems like you’re some kind of magician when it comes to fish keeping.

    in reply to: Tom’s Poco Pozo #354874

    JK91
    Participant

    Amazing Tom, simply amazing. 

     

    What are your water parameters? DH, KH and pH and such? Microsiemens?

    in reply to: Tom’s Poco Pozo #354215

    JK91
    Participant

    Interesting. Good to know a stronger filtration helps the plants grow and free from debris (as I write it now, it all seems pretty obvious). 

    Last question, regarding the wood you use in your tank. Here in The Netherlands, it’s common to buy the wood in store or online. Getting the wood from a forest is an absolute no-go. In your older thread, you pictured yourself with a trunk, later using it in a tank, so I’m curious if you got this wood from somewhere outside? Maybe it’s the same trunk as before?

    in reply to: Tom’s Poco Pozo #354211

    JK91
    Participant

    Thanks for the quick reply. That’s quite an upgrade in terms of filtration. Do you think it would help the hairgrass to recover, though? You could use some clay to stick in the sand to help them grow, perhaps? Nothing too much, so it doesn’t get murky when a fish digs it up.

    in reply to: Otocinclus ID #354208

    JK91
    Participant

    Taken from PlanetCatfish, a post from Mike_Noren:

    “No, vittatus and vestitus can, apparently, only be separated by the number of pore-bearing plates along their sidelines, a character best seen in electron microscope – it is not possible to see in a photo, and very difficult to see even under a stereo microscope (I’ve tried).

    However, vittatus is the most common and widespread of all otos, while vestitus has a distribution which suggests it may really be three different species, all with extremely restricted distribution, none of which is in areas where aquarium fish are collected.

    In other words, I can’t rule out that your fish is a vestitus, but assuming vestitus and vittatus are not in reality one and the same species, it’s a good bet it isn’t.”

    The Oto in the picture doesn’t show the white spot at the end of the tail, so I think we can rule out O. mariae. My bet would be O. vittatus.

    in reply to: Tom’s Poco Pozo #354206

    JK91
    Participant

    This looks amazing Tom. Your tank is a real inspiration for others (especially for me). 

    What kind of filter do you use? And what kind of soil? I assume the plants don’t grow in a soil consisting out of just sand.

    in reply to: Beckfordi-Is it courtship or male dominance? #353250

    JK91
    Participant

    Yep. Two males trying to impress. 

    in reply to: Dario dario #353200

    JK91
    Participant

    Hey people,

    Just wanted to inform you guys about my latest.. proceedings. A few weeks ago I added a group of ten cherry barbs (P. titteya). An old love of mine, but soon I figured out it was not a good choice. They were far too active for the other fish, especially the P. ocellatus. Yesterday I finally told myself things had to be done. I ordered several pieces of wood to fill up the decoration in the aquarium. More hiding places and more ‘breaking of the line of sight’ of the fish was my goal. It should arrive later this week. If things work out, I could perhaps add Indostomus paradoxus to the tank. 

    I removed the cherry barbs yesterday aswell. Oddly enough, I could only find nine of them. I never saw a dead one laying around, so I’m kind of puzzled on this one. They’re very hardy fish aswell. Oh well, there’s now only Dario hysginon and Parasphaerichthys ocellatus in the tank. As I was watching the tank this morning, I noticed some odd behaviour from the fish. The Para’s were schooled alltogether, while normally, they’re all across the tank. They like eachother’s company, but they normally don’t really sit together like they were today, unless I’m redecorating the tank. I was a bit concerned about this, but then I saw some other odd behaviour, this time from the Dario hysginon. The dominant males always showed their beautiful colour, but this time they were even more intense. As I was watching them, one male approached a female and soon after that, they were actually spawning! They might have been doing this before, I’m not sure, but this was the first time I actually saw it. Soon after that, I noticed another male “ticking” a female, quickly sprinting away trying to lure her his way. She, infatuated by his flashy jacket and all of course, willingly followed him and after a few more ticks the male curled up around her and they spawned. These two spawnings happened in a timespan of like two minutes. Never seen it before, so I’m quite proud. Quite confused too, because the Para’s showed behaviour which could indicate they are scared or stressed of something, but the Dario’s are having the time of their life.

    I only removed the barbs yesterday and did a little water change, so I’m not sure what really caused this change of behaviour and how long it will stay this way. Just thought it might be a little bit interesting for you guys.

    Also, I was reading about how Parasphaerichthys linneatus simply die off one by one in one of the topics here. Maybe my water is blessed, but I’d say the P. ocellatus are more hardy than their smaller nephews. One had a damaged eye and I thought he was going to lose it, but now I wouldn’t even be able to recall which one it was, because they’re all perfectly healthy (except for their behaviour today, which I can’t explain). I haven’t seen any courtship yet, though, but who knows! I was going to add another five or six to the six that are already in the tank, so they feel a little bit more safe, but my mum claimed the car today, so that’ll have to wait until tomorrow or so. 

    Hope you guys enjoyed the little update. Cheers!

    in reply to: Tom's Bucket O' Mud #353088

    JK91
    Participant

    I have considered them, but I looking at their profile I’m guessing they’d prefer acid water, where as my pH should be around 7.5. They don’t have to be particulary shy, because the Dario’s are quite the bullies. I’m also considering shrimps like the Cardina multidentata, because they are also splendid algae eaters, but I’m discouraged by the fact that they don’t breed in freshwater and I’d really like to have some young now and then. I have tried Neocardidina heteropoda (var. red), but they ended up as expensive live food. They were hunted down by the Dario, although they were similar or bigger in size than the fish.

    Although I have kept dwarf cichlids for quite some time before this project, never did I have a species with such temperament as the Dario. Although they make it very difficult for me at times, I really love them. They are fascinating fish.

    I’m also considering a Barbus or Pethia species, but I’m not sure they’d clean up as well as I’d like them to.

    Sorry to invade your topic, btw. My brain always runs at full speed when thinking about how I can solve problems in my tank.

    in reply to: Tom's Bucket O' Mud #353086

    JK91
    Participant

    Thanks Tom, I’ll look into them. Although I’m having a hard time figuring out what fish are best to combine, I love asking people’s opinion about them and searching through the internet for as much information I can get. This hobby never gets boring.

    in reply to: Tom's Bucket O' Mud #353075

    JK91
    Participant

    Thanks Tom! I do consider breeding, but at the moment the Dario only chase eachother around (I haven’t seen any indications that they should be breeding) and I think I might have six male Para’s, which would be extremely unlucky. It’s quite hard to tell a female from a male, only that a female should look a bit rounder/bigger than a male and I guess some look a bit different, so who knows.

    I just need a fish who cleans up after the Dario and Para’s, but is also a suitable tankmate and is found with the Dario and/or Para’s. It’s nearly impossible, that much I can tell you.

    in reply to: Tom's Bucket O' Mud #353073

    JK91
    Participant

    Hi Tom,

    I’ve been thinking about adding Petruichthys sp. Rosy to my tank. When I feed my fish, a lot of it just falls to the bottom of the tank to much delight of the numerous snails I have. That’s why I’ve been searching for a more or less ground dwelling fish from Myanmar, like the rosy loach. Just wanted a bit more info before I take the step. Would you consider them a rather calm and timid fish? Currently, I have Dario hysginon and Parasphaerichthys ocellatus, so I wouldn’t want a fish that would totally boss the tank, so to say, but they shouldn’t be pushovers either, because the Dario’s can be quite agressive, especially the dominant males. Would you consider it a decent combination or should I look for another species?

    Cheers,

    Jeff

    in reply to: Dario dario #353061

    JK91
    Participant

    Ah, thanks Matt.

    I bought a group of six and they’ve been here for exactly a week. They all seem fine (although one seems to have something on his eye, not sure what it is), but they are really, really shy. They spurt away every time I enter the room, although it is a bit less than at the beginning. The two dominant Dario’s are also a bit angry at the newcomers who seem to have no idea what a territory is.

    Nah, I think it’s my mistake really. Obviously, the shy Para’s are looking for hiding places, most of which are already taken by the Dario’s, so I have to come up with an solution.

    My main ideas to comfort them are:
    1) adding film containers or PVC pipes;
    2) adding a schooling fish (I figure the only suitable ones are P. gelius?) who don’t shy away quickly

    The second idea comes from keeping dwarf cichlids before. They seemed a bit more confident with a school of fish above and around them. Perhaps it works the same way with the Para’s. I don’t want these fish to take all the food from the Dario’s and Para’s though, because they are really, really slow eaters.

    Right, I’m off searching for film containers. Who the hell still has those, anyway?!

    in reply to: Dario dario #353010

    JK91
    Participant

    Figured I’d better post here, instead of starting a new topic.

    I have been thinking and I think I might give the P. ocellatus a try. They are the only species beside Oryzias dancena that interest me and would be suitable tankmates for the D. hysginon. Is the database correct that they need a lower pH than the P. linaetus? I can’t find much more info than the info on here. I have tried to contact Frank, but he doesn’t seem to visit SF anymore and he doesn’t clearify what his water parameters were in the topic where he got them to breeding, but maybe someone of you know more? 

    Thanks in advance.

    in reply to: Dario dario #352993

    JK91
    Participant

    In the search of an adequate tankmate for the Dario’s, I’ve come across the Parasphaerichtys ocellatus. They do require a lower pH than the D. hysginon. I have a pH of 7,5. Not sure about the hardness of my water, but it should be rather soft. Should I add these or look further? How many should I add? A small group of six?

    They are 6 euros (or approx 8,5 UK pounds) per specimen.

     

    Edit: My mistake. I think I’m better off with the Parasphaerichthys lineatus. They are found with D. hysginon and do want a higher pH. My search to completion continues!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)