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Byron Hosking

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 148 total)
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  • in reply to: Normans Lampeye #355463

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    There is no profile on SF for this species.  Poropanchax normani seems the current accepted name (according to Eschmeyer, CAS database).  I found this site which may help:

    http://www.killi.co.uk/speciesProfile/Poropanchax/normani

    Byron.

    in reply to: College 10 gallon #355448

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    Yes, I always “silent cycle” with live plants.  Easier and safer.

    Play Sand works very well, and is the least expensive substrate available.  Don’t know where you are, but if in NA, have a look for Quikrete Play Sand at Home Depot or Lowe’s.  I now have this in all 8 tanks.

    in reply to: College 10 gallon #355445

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    I do not recommend “plant” substrates, unless you intend an aquatic garden of plants with no fish where these expensive substrates might benefit.  I only use fine gravel or sand.  With large plants, one can use substrate fertiliser tabs, but this won’t be applicable here with a small tank and small plants.  If it is needed, a liquid comprehensive supplement will be all you need.

    Given the likely fish and the tank size, sand seems the best substrate.

    I did use Flourite so-called plant substrate once, but it was a complete waste of money.  I still had to use liquid and substrate fertilizers the same as in my sand and gravel tanks, and the plants (same species) were no better.  After two years I tore it down and now have play sand.

    Byron.

    in reply to: College 10 gallon #355443

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    The filter rather depends upon the fish, and live plants.  I would hope plants are intended, as they will benefit not only water quality but the fish suited to this sort of aquarium.  So with that in mind, you could use a simple sponge filter, though this means an air pump.  The Fluval U1 might be too much for this sort of tank; I’ve not had it myself so I have no idea just how much current it produces, or if this can be controlled.  With the sort of small “nano” fish you do not want anything but minimal water current.  No filter at all is an option; I had a planted 10g running for over a year with no filter, and it had a group of pygmy corys (9-10) and Boraras brigittae (12), some snails (the small like Malaysian Livebearing).  No filter, just a heater.

    Knowing the water parameters would help us suggest fish.

    in reply to: Stocking a 24 inch long 5 gallon? #355439

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    T. vitatta is considerably larger, and like the profile here, I would suggest more space for this.

    Chocolates (Sphaerichthys osphromenoides, or S. selatanensis or S. vaillanti) are approximately the same in size, need a small group, and having had the first two I would say larger quarters.  I presently have a group of seven in a 30g (113 litres) which is about minimum in my view.  I have seen a pair forming and expect spawning and some fry, as occurred the last time I had these about six years back.  The fourth species, S. acrostoma, is larger and needs even more room.  Males of all gourami are territorial, some species much worse than others naturally, but it is still a predominant trait that must be kept in mind when tank space is involved.  My chocolates exert their dominance particularly at feeding time, which is how I’ve spotted the pair; everyone else is harshly driven away by the male, then the two do their little dance.

    Betta (male presumably, and the common B. splendens) is not a community fish, and needs to be in its own space.  A basic 5g is fine, but not with other fish.  I’ve no experience with the other wild species.

    M. cruciatus needs more space in my view; I had a group of six in a 90cm leng 33g, but 75cm (30 inches) length is the minimum I would suggest.  A fairly quiet species for loaches, at least my group was.

    Byron.

    in reply to: Stocking a 24 inch long 5 gallon? #355437

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    If the Rosy Loach is the species Petruichthys sp. ‘rosy’ as in our database:

    http://www.seriouslyfish.com/species/yunnanilus-sp-rosy/

    I would think this a good fish for this tank, in a group.  I have not come across this particular species, but it seems to be active (which you wanted).  This could be a lovely aquascape with sand, bits of wood, and plants including floating, for this beauty.

    Honey Gourami I would say no.  There are some “dwarf” species suited though, like the pygmy sparkling gourami Trichopsis pumila, or the Eyespot Gourami Parasphaerichthys ocellatus.  I’ve had both of these.  My only reservation might be the activity level of the loaches, which I can’t comment on as I’ve never had this one.  I have had Micronemacheilus cruciatus together with both of these gourami with no issues, though that was in a larger tank, but activity-wise I didn’t notice issues.  The gourami would remain near the surface, so a nice combo from the aspect of filling the space.

    Byron.

    in reply to: Stocking a 24 inch long 5 gallon? #355435

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    That is very soft water, so you have more options as the majority of the “nano” type of fish are soft water.  You can also expect the pH to lower naturally once the biological system is established.

    A 5g is still not much room, and your choices in species will not be much different from the standard 5 gallon, but with the length and width you have more space, if that makes sense, so the numbers can be a bit better.  Plants should do well in the shallower tank with less light, which again suits these fish.

    Byron.

    in reply to: Stocking a 24 inch long 5 gallon? #355433

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    If you could provide your source water parameters, namely GH, KH and pH, it will help.  Most of the suitable fish for smallish tanks will be wild caught with a higher preference for specific parameters.

    Byron.


    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    I am not insisting on the heat/salt…but my point previously was that this is a much less detrimental treatment on sensitive fish than most chemical medications that would contain copper or malachite green for example.  Corys are as “sensitive” as the barbs, even more so, but the heat and salt is temporary, two weeks maximum, one week might do it.

    The ranges for GH, pH and temperature of a species are intended to be for permanent maintenance.  My pencilfish are pH 5 fish.  And as for the salt, loaches, corys and characins are about the most sensitive fish you can have.

    I know nothing at all about chloroquinone phosphate, so I won’t guess at its possible effectiveness or detriment.  As for Hydrogen peroxide, I would myself never put that in an aquarium with fish, but I know some use it for algae on plants.  Remember that every substance added to the tank water is going to get inside the fish, by osmosis through the cells, entering the bloodstream and many internal organs.  Heat is not going to be like this, and salt we know has quite different reactions.  Neale Monks is probably the most highly respected ichthyologist in the hobby, and this was his recommended treatment.  Up to you.

    Metronidazole in the food should be OK with barbs, as it was for my more sensitive species.  I’m not saying it will be effective, any more than salt/heat.  I have used metro for internal protozoan with good effect, but it did not deal with external parasites as well as heat/salt.

    Byron.


    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    I would suggest salt and heat, if you are certain this is an external parasite of the ich or velvet type.  On the advice of Neale Monks, I did this with my sensitive wild-caught fish (loaches, corys and pencilfish) and it dealt with a stubborn case of ich.  Raise the temp to 85F/30c and use 2 g per litre of aquarium salt (not marine).  One level teaspoon is approximately 6 grams (I found this helpful, as I am without a scale).  Do a major water change first, then add the salt over several hours, say a day, and maintain for 1-2 weeks; I found a 2-week period better.  Replace salt at the same dose for any fresh water (only) added at waterchanges during the treatment period.

    Metrodonidazole is effective for internal protozoan, but better if taken orally, by mixing it with food.  I have used this also with sensitive fish mentioned previously (separate issue, not together with the heat/salt).

    Byron.

    in reply to: Fish suggestions for 45 cm Planted Iwagumi #355376

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    Yes, many of our terms are quite subjective, which makes it more difficult to ensure we are all on the same page.

    One thing to keep in mind when watching videos of natural rivers is that the flow is strongest in the centre, and much less so along the banks.  And it is along the banks under overhanging vegetation or among twisted branches and sometimes aquatic vegetation that the fish are usually though not always found.  Then there is the wet season of six months when the forest floods and the fish move into the flooded forest, where the flow will be negligible, more like a pond.  When the dry season occurs, the receding water forces the fish into the streams and rivers, but this is not to say the fish prefer this; they have no option.

    Fighting any current takes energy for the fish, and this can easily be detrimental.  One author in TFH used the analogy of driving a car up a steep hill; it takes more energy/gas to maintain the same speed as on level ground.  If fish are having to expend significant energy just to “live” it can deprive them of needed energy for their immune system, digestion, etc., and cause them to literally wear out sooner.

    One important observation can be taken from having a large tank (115g, 5 feet in length) with a canister filter.  The flow from the filter return will be quite strong, and if this is placed at one end of the tank (and it can be directed into the wall to further dissipate), it will become naturally reduced as it moves down the length of the tank to the filter intake.  With more than a hundred smallish fish in this tank, it was interesting to observe how many of them show a preference to invariably remain out of the strongest flow.

    Byron.


    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    I have not kept the Honey Gourami, so I’ll leave that for other members to comment.  But keep in mind that the male Honey is the colourful one, with females a dull brown.  A single male with no females present should be peaceful, according to species data.  Have a look at the data in our knowledge base here, http://www.seriouslyfish.com/species/trichogaster-chuna/ .  It suggests a small group.

    I have or have had Pearls, pygmy sparkling, licorice, Chocolate (two species of), and Eyespot Gourami.  With my very soft source water it is easy to provide suitable environments for the more delicate species.

    Byron.

    in reply to: Fish suggestions for 45 cm Planted Iwagumi #355371

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    There are not really a lot of fish in the hobby that appreciate strong currents, but a couple occur to me.  Some of the loricariids from certain fast-flowing streams and rivers in South America, such as the Rio Xingu, is one group.  A second would be the hillstream loaches of SE Asia.

    But this raises the issue of a planted tank.  The above-mentioned fish, especially the loaches, require algae mats to graze, and as this is a planted tank you might not want to be encouraging algae.

    Byron.


    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    Gourami and cichlids have much in common.  The males are territorial, and the level of this defence of “their” space can differ from individual to individual within the same species, and obviously differs from species to species.  However, females sometimes decide to exert aggressive behaviours too.  This aggressiveness (male and female) is obviously strongest toward others of the species, sometimes violently so leading to death, but it can turn against other species.

    Of the three species yo mention, the Honey is by far the most peaceful, but remember that individual fish can for various reasons behave contrary to the norm.  Males and females are easy to tell apart.  The Pearl is the one I would consider next, and the Dwarf last.  Also, the Dwarf is still not “clear” of the iridovirus problem so it is wise not to acquire this species unless it comes from a reputable breeder.

    Gourami are by nature shoaling fish, living in groups.  Behaviours among individuals within the group can be very interesting, and worth providing for by having a group in suitable space tanks.  A single male with two or three females is a good combination; more than one male needs space.  And it is good to have two females so the male is less likely to force his attentions on one to the point of severe distress and death.  I have not personally kept these fish as individuals, but that doesn’t mean they can’t be.

    The “feelers” are actually thread-like pelvic fins, and they have taste cells at the tips, so all gourami will use these to sense their surroundings.

    Byron.

    in reply to: Cycling my 29 gallon #355358

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    I concur with Entomancer that the plants are taking up most of the ammonia.  This is their preferred source of nitrogen, and they can take up quite a lot of it.  Some will still get left for the nitrifying bacteria, but it will be less obvious.

    I never “cycle” tanks as I always have plants, especially floating which are fast growing and thus use even more nutrients including ammonia/ammonium.  Personally, I would stop adding ammonia, do a few water changes, and add some fish.  We can advise which if you indicate the intended species; it is not a problem of “cycling” issues with the fish, but one of tank maturity; some fish are better in newer tanks than others.

    Puyallup is on the coast side of the Rockies, so I would assume your water is much the same as Plaamoo, and mine (I am up in the Vancouver, BC area which also has very soft water).  My GH and KH are next to zero.  I do not mess with buffers, as I have all soft water fish.  It makes life much simpler.Wink

    Byron.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 148 total)